Canadians are proud of their citizenship and the status, rights, and freedoms that it provides.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC, formerly CIC) is the federal department that manages Canadian citizenship, both for those applying for citizenship and for current Canadian citizens. Since 2010, Canada has welcomed an average of more than 260,000 permanent residents each year. Many of these newcomers are in the process of becoming Canadian citizens, and many more will apply for Canadian citizenship in the future. When that process is complete, they take loyalty oaths pledging their commitment to the responsibilities and privileges of Canadian citizenship.

Canadian Citizenship Eligibility

A Canadian immigrant may apply for Canadian Citizenship after spending at least four years in Canada as a permanent resident. Do you meet the requirements for Canadian citizenship? Read more.

Applying for Canadian Citizenship

You will need to satisfy several requirements to submit a Canadian citizenship application, and will then need to take a Canadian citizenship test. Learn more about the process. Read more.

Canadian Citizenship Ceremony

Once you are approved as a Canadian citizen, you can attend a Citizenship Ceremony to take Canada's Oath of Citizenship. What's the Citizenship Ceremony like? Read more.

Rights and Responsibilities of Canadian Citizens

Canadian permanent residents enjoy many, but not all, of the rights of Canadian citizens. Learn the additional rights that you will have as a Canadian citizen. Read more.

Dual Citizenship

Canada recognizes dual citizenship. You are not required by Canada to give up your previous citizenship once you become a Canadian citizen. How does this work? Read more.

 

Contact us with any question(s) concerning Canadian citizenship requirements and applications.

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Latest News

  • Montreal Set to Become a Sanctuary City

    Canada's second-largest city, Montreal, will vote on Monday on whether the city should be designated a "sanctuary city." If the city council approves the idea, as is expected, Montreal will join other Canadian cities such as Toronto, Vancouver, and Hamilton, which have official policies not to discriminate against undocumented immigrants and refugees by denying them services. Moreover, sanctuary cities also pledge not to use immigration status, or lack thereof, as a pretext to arrest or deport individuals if they come into contact with law enforcement on non-criminal offences such as parking tickets.

  • Immigration to Nova Scotia Highest in Decades, With More Growth Expected

    The Nova Scotia Office of Immigration is boasting record immigration numbers to the province, with many skilled workers, entrepreneurs, refugees, and family member of Canadian citizens and permanent residents having made a new home in the province. Overall, preliminary figures for last year to the end of October reveal that 4,835 newcomers arrived in Nova Scotia, the highest intake in decades.