Individuals who wish to enter Canada, as Permanent or Temporary Residents, must meet the requirements of Canada's Immigration law and regulations, especially as they regard health and security.

A Temporary Resident Permit (TRP) may be issued, at the discretion of Canadian Immigration Authorities, to individuals who would otherwise be inadmissible to Canada because of health or criminality issues, permitting them to enter or stay in Canada, where justified by compelling circumstances.

In deciding whether or not to issue a Temporary Resident Permit, a Canadian Immigration Visa Officer will weigh the inadmissible person's need to enter or remain in Canada against the health and security risks to the Canadian population. You must be able to demonstrate that your entry into Canada is justified, no matter how minor the reason you are inadmissible may seem. You will also have to pay a processing fee of $200 CAN, which will not be refunded if your application is refused.

A Temporary Resident Permit is issued for the length of your stay in Canada (up to three years) and may be extended from inside Canada. The permit is no longer valid if the holder exits Canada, unless re-entry had been authorized at the time of issuance. The permit can also be cancelled by an officer at any time.

In certain circumstances, the holder of a Temporary Resident Permit will be granted permanent resident status in Canada.

To apply for a Temporary Resident Visa, you will need to submit an application with the supporting documents explaining the reason behind your inadmissibility and why your entry into Canada may be justified. If you are a citizen of a visa-exempt country, you will need to apply based on the guidelines set out by your specific country as the application form may be different.

Contact us for more information about Temporary Resident Permits.

Inadmissibility

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