Campbell Cohen is a Canadian Immigration law firm that provides advice on matters pertaining to immigrating to Canada.

Attorney David Cohen, of the Campbell Cohen Canadian immigration law firm, has particular expertise in all areas related to Canadian immigration matters and provides representation and advice to foreign nationals who are looking to obtain a Canada visa and enter Canada on a permanent or temporary basis.

Our law firm is focused on getting clients to Canada in the shortest possible time through a variety of avenues, including finding work in Canada.

Canadian immigration law firm, Campbell Cohen, currently employs a staff of over 60 lawyers, paralegals and support staff, all of whom are dedicated to ensuring that you meet Canadian immigration requirements. is a website developed by Canadian immigration Attorney David Cohen and is recognized as a comprehensive electronic source of information on the Canadian immigration process. Moreover, the firm has grown to include the Campbell Cohen Canada Immigration Network, a network of industry leading Canadian immigration-related websites that have all been designed to connect potential immigrants to Canada.

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Latest News

  • Government of Canada Publishes New Criteria for Urgent Processing of Permanent Residence Cards

    The government of Canada has made public its criteria for the urgent processing of permanent residence cards. At the time of writing, an application for a permanent residence card takes an estimated 41 days to process for a new card, or 63 days for a renewal or replacement. However, there are certain urgent situations whereby an individual may have his or her application for a card expedited.

  • International Graduates Granted Reprieve after Refusal of Post-Graduation Work Permit Applications

    A group of former international students whose applications for Post-Graduation Work Permits (PGWPs) were refused are now able to re-submit their applications. Canada’s Minister of Immigration, John McCallum, has established a public policy to reconsider applications for three-year open work permits from certain graduates.