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Blog > 2010 > Canadian Immigration in the Year Ahead

Canadian Immigration in the Year Ahead

December 21st, 2010

Canadian immigration policy will likely come under considerable scrutiny in 2011. Most political pundits predict that Canadians will be going to the polls next spring to elect a national government and if that happens Canada’s approach towards immigration is certain to come up for debate.

There are at least two major immigration items that political parties will have to take a position on and it will be interesting to see which party’s banner voters line up behind. In fact, the electioneering has already begun.

The first point of contention is a piece of legislation recently introduced by the current Conservative government entitled “Preventing Human Smugglers from Abusing Canada’s Immigration System”. While nobody argues with the title’s intention, the opposition parties have announced that they will not support the proposed law in its present form. The Liberals have stated that the legislation “isn’t tough enough on smugglers and instead targets their victims”. They have a point here as the law would permit Canadian immigration authorities to detain genuine asylum seeking men, women and children for up to a year. Truth be told, there is very little likelihood that the new law, if passed, would survive a court challenge because it does seem to contravene the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The Conservatives, of course, know this but will probably continue to push the bill forward because it is consistent with the “tough on crime” message that resonates so well among their political base.

The second controversial issue pertaining to immigration involves a recently leaked memo indicating that the Canadian and U.S. administrations are on the verge of signing an agreement to put in place a North American security perimeter. Most everyone would agree that, in theory, a deal to strengthen continental security while easing the flow of goods and people within the perimeter is a positive objective. However, in exchange for a promised thinner border Canadians will want to know the cost in the terms of sovereignty, privacy and immigration policy. The deal so far is light on the details. The possibility of Canada giving up sovereignty to the U.S. in a secretly negotiated border security deal has opposition parties wary and we can expect to hear a lot more on this topic in the coming weeks and months.

The one thing that I would hope for is that the arguments for and against the political positions taken by each party be made in a civilized manner. There are, however, a lot of strong feelings associated with immigration and given the rhetoric of election campaigns, civil debate is probably too much to ask for. So for now, in the lull before the storm, I take this opportunity to wish all of you a warm and happy holiday season and a healthy new year.



 
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24 Responses to “Canadian Immigration in the Year Ahead”

  • On December 21st, 2010, hinavin said ...

    Thank you for putting the often fragmanted news articles into perspective – helps in better, a more wholistic understanding. A civil debate in what some would term a bit old fashioned still exposes the involved parties to an environment which is free and where challenges can be thrown easily. Hence, probably will be ducked as you are mention. Although the concern around sovereignty or its perception has to be a close to heart agenda for every citizen. And rightfully so! Seasons Greetings!

  • On December 22nd, 2010, Anonymous said ...

    I would personally welcome any change that would allow properly qualified Candidates to go back on the list. I have a Ph.D degree and an MBA with two bachelors in management and under the recent changes. I dont qualify for permanent residence which is wrong. I believe coming from Europe and having a wide range of working experience in the public and private sector that I would be able to contribute and not be a burden to the state as I would be coming to purchase my own home and with a family.

  • On December 22nd, 2010, Anonymous said ...

    Thank you for sharing this valuable info, I read every newsletter and find great value in it. Happy New Year

  • On December 22nd, 2010, Bill Pierce said ...

    As an American who has now settled in Canada with dual citizenship, I have some perspective about a proposed “North American security perimeter.” Yes, it poses sovereignty questions for Canada. Personally I would welcome and benefit from an easing of the border crossing restrictions that have made travel between the two countries much less pleasant than the days of my youth (I grew up in Detroit/Windsor) when it was more relaxed than the aggravation is has become today. But I remain uncertain whether Canadians should buy into the “fortress North America” mentality that seems to be the price it would be necessary to pay to achieve it. The issue merits careful study and public discussion rather than a leaked secret “memorandum of understanding.”

  • On December 23rd, 2010, Craig Campbell said ...

    Thanks for the insights.

  • On December 23rd, 2010, Anonymous said ...

    Merry Christmas and a Happy new year to you and your staff.

  • On December 23rd, 2010, Anonymous said ...

    Things are really getting more and more interesting on the North American. What’s next unified US and CAN territories in the guise of hemispheric security, not a bad idea after all, what do you think?

  • On December 23rd, 2010, ashoke Kumar said ...

    I am waiting for new rule when it can be changed. I am professionally an accountant and want to apply for migrate. I am post graduate in mananagement and also commerce graduate and also qulified IELTS. Please let me know when rule will be changed for accountant?

  • On December 24th, 2010, farooq said ...

    thank you for providing and sharing the information .hope to find it useful in future also. another thing i want to share is there should be an article also for the people who had applied for immigration and waiting their turn for a long time how to make plans for their future.Happy New Year

  • On December 25th, 2010, Anonymous said ...

    i dont know why cannada have to lengthy processing time.

  • On December 25th, 2010, Anonymous said ...

    it is realy hard for those who are waiting fot year and having no response from cic

  • On December 25th, 2010, Anonymous said ...

    Any idea when IT will be added again in demand list of profession for Canadian immigration?

  • On December 29th, 2010, gagandeep said ...

    m having 6 years experience in construction field but cant apply for pr under fedrela skilled program …… as my occupation is not in noc list …..hope in next year dis rule will be relaxed for masny aspirants

  • On January 1st, 2011, Anonymous said ...

    Commenting on the 22nd Dec submission,by annonymous, yes pray tell me , someone with a Phd. MBA and 2 more bachelor and to top that a European with private and public sector experience -if he is not skilled enough and would burden on the economy – how will bringing a declared number of immigrants of 230,000 (total of 250,000 less 20,000 -skilled) positively impact the economy ? A massive 230,000 strong immigrants who are not scrutinized for age, education,experience, and language skills. Someone please explain this to me…..

  • On January 2nd, 2011, Mike said ...

    I’ve been a staunch conservative in my home country, but at the next election I will certainly vote against the Conservatives with a vengeance. “Tough on crime”? I am very “tough on crime” and I also support strong anti-terror laws. But this has nothing to do with the free movement of people and the freedom to pursue their dreams! Thank you Mr. Cohen!

  • On January 3rd, 2011, Mike said ...

    @January 1st, 2011, Anonymous: An immigrant in Canada certainly does not have to be a burden on the economy. If the immigrant is not able to find a job within a certain period of month, say 6 months, he/she should be returned back home. There is no point for someone to stay there if he’s unable to find employment after a period of time. The immigrant should not be entitled to welfare benefits unless he contributed for at least 1 year to the system. However, not allowing him/her at all if he does not have a job offer in hand is profoundly not realistic since the Canadian employer is asking the immigrant job seeker to have its “legal status” solved before being considered for a position. In the vast majority of cases, the employer does not want “to sponsor” for the Federal Skilled Worker program which actually makes sense.

  • On January 6th, 2011, Anonymous said ...

    cic should be more proactive and more realistic in there dealings.With the new changes what happen to the backlog at hand.Intending immigrants are being held in suspense for years not sure of their next actions.

  • On January 6th, 2011, Anonymous said ...

    I currently pass the six (6) criteria used to evaluate those wishing to enter Canada, these are: 1) work history, education, language ability, adaptibility (family in Canada), my age range is good. However I don’t qualify as Economics and Teaching is not on the list of occupations. I hope this list is revised that all occupations may be treated with equality

  • On January 8th, 2011, Anonymous said ...

    This is of course a good news that something for human will be discussed. When we say Human it means human without any prejudice to American or Britons.

  • On January 18th, 2011, Rosan said ...

    In the year 2011-2012 the Canadian government should be
    focused on the ICT-professional as an immigrants. The only one tool to make everything possible is by the use of ICT so to make prosperous Canada the government should be focused on ICT.

  • On January 18th, 2011, canadaupdates_com said ...

    Immigration on a whole is very beneficial to Canada and its residents. History tells repeatedly that it is human kind that loses its previleges. Immigration is good for Canada and its people in any way you consider but the undeue advantage taken by a few people in the name of refugee act bestowed by Canadian government is being highly misused. We have to wait and see how far Canada can allow people in the name of refugees. Of course, humanitarian concerns are to be given the highest priority for human kind’s development and survival but misuse of a syustm is highly deplorable. Let us all pray that the gates of immigration be not closed for all those good people and eligible aspirants just because of the refugees who infiltrate this country and can be a bigger and unsolvable problem. As of now Canada is large in heart and resources.

  • On January 28th, 2011, @Rosan said ...

    No, they don’t. Instead they want you to be a welder, or a plumber or something like that. See their list of high demand occupations. I am a software engineer too. I decided to change my career. I will apply for Canada as a Chef. Oh my :) )

  • On February 2nd, 2011, Anonymous said ...

    Keep up the good work :)

  • On February 28th, 2011, Anonymous said ...

    i hope they come with new immigration minister that finish up the backlog before February 2008, because what they did was absolutely unfair, you find that candidates applying few months ago land in Canada before those who applied 5 years, we are, the applicants, looking for a better place to live , i hope that minister Kenny read this.

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