Dentists - NOC 3113

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If you are interested in working as a Dentist in Canada, you will be pleased to know that the job outlook for your occupation in Canada is extremely positive. You can use this overview of the Canadian employment prospects in your field to start planning your immigration and settlement in Canada.

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Dentists diagnose, treat, prevent and control disorders of the teeth and mouth. They work in private practice or may be employed in hospitals, clinics, public health facilities or universities.

(Description from Employment and Social Development Canada's National Occupation Classification, used by Canadian immigration officers, to assess an applicant's work experience.)

  • Examine patients' teeth, gums and surrounding tissue to diagnose disease, injury and decay and plan appropriate treatment
  • Restore, extract and replace diseased and decayed teeth
  • Perform oral surgery, periodontal surgery and other treatments
  • Clean teeth and instruct patients on oral hygiene
  • Design bridgework, fit dentures and provide appliances to correct abnormal positioning of the teeth and jaws, or write fabrication instructions or prescriptions for use by denturists and dental technicians
  • Supervise dental hygienists, dental assistants and other staff.
  • Dentists may specialize in such areas as oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, endodontics, prosthodontics, oral pathology, oral radiology or public health dentistry.
 

  • dental officer – military
  • dental surgeon
  • dentist
  • dentist, public health
  • doctor of dental surgery
  • endodontist
  • general practice dentist
  • implantologist – dentistry
  • oral and dental surgeon
  • oral and maxillofacial surgeon
  • oral medicine specialist
  • oral pathologist
  • oral pathology and maxillofacial surgery specialist
  • oral radiologist
  • oral surgeon
  • orthodontist
  • pediatric dentist
  • pedodontist
  • periodontist
  • prosthodontist
  • public health dentist
  • specialist, oral medicine
  • stomatologist
  • surgeon, dental
  • surgeon, oral
  • surgeon, oral and maxillofacial
 

Why your employment prospects in Canada are excellent:

  • Dentists work in private practice or may be employed in hospitals, clinics, public health facilities or universities.
  • Population growth, an aging population and technological advancement in diagnosis and treatment across the country are increasing the demand for dentists
  • As dentists' practices expand, they are likely to hire more dental hygienists and dental assistants.
  • Dentists must continually update their knowledge and skills on new dental procedures and practices. Opportunities for ongoing learning and professional growth are offered through continuing education courses and seminars.
  • Possible career opportunities outside the dental practice include working as a dental educator, researcher, administrator or a sales representative.
  • One to four years of additional training will enable a dentist to move from general practice to an area of specialization.
  • Some dentists are employed by local, provincial and federal health authorities or choose to serve in the Canadian Armed Forces.

Find out about the salary ranges for Dentists in different Canadian cities with our Canada Salary Calculator

Some areas of Canada where your occupation is in demand:

While there is a shortage of Dentists across Canada, the following cities and provinces listed below have a particularly high demand for this occupation.

British Columbia
  • Health care in B.C., in terms of both the number of practitioners and the amount of funding, has increased considerably over the last decade.
  • Population growth, an aging population, and technological advancement in diagnosis and treatment, are also increasing the demand for dental services.
  • In addition, many opportunities for dentists will become available due to retirements, which are expected to make up a significant number of new jobs.
  • Industry sources report the current supply of new graduates is insufficient to meet demand. In particular, there is currently a shortage of dentists in rural areas of the province.
  • Projected new jobs are estimated at 750 between 2010 and 2015. While new jobs due to retirements are predicted at 540 during the same period.

Northern British Columbia:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • An aging population will result in a greater need for adult dental care in this area.
  • In addition, the percentage of the population with employment related dental plans is a significant factor in the demand for dental services.

Thompson Okanagan Kootenay Area, British Columbia:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • An aging population will result in a greater need for adult dental care in this area.

Vancouver and Lower Mainland Southwest, British Columbia:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in this local area.
  • The growth in new dental jobs throughout B.C. is driven by population growth, especially the large number of aging baby boomers, resulting in more people requiring dental care.
  • The general increase in the income of many families has made preventive dental care more affordable and this should continue in the future.

Vancouver Island and Victoria, British Columbia:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.

Alberta
Athabasca / Grande Prairie / Peace River, Alberta :
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.
  • With an ageing population expected in the province, demand for dentists will continue to rise.

Calgary / Banff / Jasper / Rocky Mountain House, Alberta:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.
  • Employment growth is expected to be higher then the overall Alberta average.

Edmonton, Alberta:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • The occupation is termed "significant" due to the relatively high concentration of people working in this occupation within this geographic area.
  • Demand for this occupation is only expected to rise.

Lethbridge / Medicine Hat, Alberta:
  • Employment prospects are good in these local areas.

Red Deer, Alberta:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • Employers are having difficulty hiring dentists.

Saskatchewan
Regina Aream, Saskatchewan:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • The general population is getting older resulting in increased dental care needs.
  • Most dentists are self-employed or part of an associate group.
  • This is an aging work force and jobs opportunities will continue as older dentists retire.

Saskatoon and Rural West, Saskatchewan:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • There is virtually no unemployment in this occupation.

Manitoba
  • Employment prospects for dentists are expected to be good in the period 2010 - 2014.
  • The age profile for this occupation indicates a labour force older than the average for all occupations and as a result most job opportunities over the forecast period will result from retirements.
  • A proportionally larger number of positions are located in Winnipeg. All dentists in Manitoba work in the Health Care and Social Assistance sector.

Northern Manitoba:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • There is an acute shortage of dentists who are willing to work and live in the north.
  • An aging population has created a greater need for adult dental care.
  • Dentists are located in the major centers in northern Manitoba of Thompson, Flin Flon The Pas and Swan River.
  • The higher than average age profile of this occupational group will result in a need to replace dentists who retire.

Selkirk Area, Manitoba:
  • Opportunities for dentists in rural Manitoba, including the Selkirk region, are good.
  • The Manitoba Dental Association is working to increase interest in rural dentistry.

Southern Manitoba:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • There is virtually no unemployment in this occupation.

Winnipeg, Manitoba:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • An aging population results in a greater need for adult dental care.

Ontario
London-Woodstock Area, Ontario:
  • Employment opportunities for Dentists are expected to be good for the next two years.

Ottawa Region, Ontario:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • The 2006 Census data indicates that about 45 percent of dentists in the Ottawa area are 45 years or older, with over 10 percent being 60 years old or older. As a result, many new vacancies will arise due to retirements.

Toronto Region, Ontario:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • Job openings will be created each year from the need to replace workers who retire.
  • Outside Toronto some areas with growing populations have more opportunities.

New Brunswick
Campbellton/Bathurst/Caraquet/Miramichi, New Brunswick:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.
  • This is a small occupational group with an unemployment rate that is non-existent.
  • Most of the jobs in this occupation are found in the health sector.

Moncton/Shediac/Sackville/Richibucto, New Brunswick:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.
  • This is a medium occupational group with an unemployment rate that is non-existent.

Saint John/Sussex/St. Stephen, New Brunswick:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.

Nova Scotia
  • The future employment outlook for Dentists in Nova Scotia is expected to be good over the next 5 years.

Annapolis Valley (Kings, Annapolis & West Hants), Nova Scotia:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • The main reason why the employment potential is good for this local area is that an aging population is expected to continue to create demand for dental services over the next several years.
  • Self employment is common.
  • Opportunities can also come through partnership opportunities with existing practices, often as existing dentists retire.

Antigonish / Pictou / Guysborough, Nova Scotia:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.
  • Locally, opportunities in this profession are often in the form of partnerships, clinics or self-employment.
  • Jobs in established practices may occur through retirements and general turnover.

Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • An ageing population will continue to create demand for dental services over the next several years.

Colchester / Cumberland, Nova Scotia:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.
  • The main reason why the employment potential for this occupation is considered good is the lack of qualified individuals in the area should a vacancy occur.

Halifax and surrounding areas, Nova Scotia:
  • Employment prospects are good in this local area.
  • While there is no serious shortage, an aging and increasing population and a limited number of graduates in this field should maintain good employment opportunities.

South Shore (Lunenburg & Queens Counties), Nova Scotia:
  • Employment potential is good locally because an aging population will continue to create demand for dental services over the next several years.
  • Although there is not a severe shortage, someone in this occupation will have no problem joining an established group of dentists or setting up their own private practice.

Southwest Nova Scotia (Yarmouth, Shelburne & Digby Counties), Nova Scotia:
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good in these local areas.
  • The aging population will continue to create demand for dental services over the next several years.

Newfoundland and Labrador
  • Employment prospects are good throughout the Province.
  • Dentists are employed in all regions of the province. However, when compared with all occupations, a larger portion is employed in the Eastern region.
  • The Newfoundland Dental Association has indicated there are good opportunities for Dentists.
  • An aging population requiring increased dental care, the older than average age of dentists and the low concentration of dentists per population are all having a positive impact on employment opportunities.
  • A new Dental Bursary Program, announced in December 2007, will support an increase in the number of Dentists practicing throughout Newfoundland and Labrador, particularly in rural areas.

Prince Edward Island
  • Employment prospects are considered to be good throughout the Province.
  • A new dentist would have a good opportunities finding work as an associate of an established dentist on PEI.
  • An aging population contributes to the strong demand for this occupation in PEI.
 

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