With a dwindling national birthrate and baby boomers nearing the end of their lifespans towards 2030, Canada will soon be completely dependent on immigration to maintain population and economic growth. According to a Statistics Canada national census, immigration is currently responsible for two thirds of Canada's 5.4 percent growth.

This trend will continue and the Canadian economy and Canadian employers will become even more reliant on newly arriving immigrants and foreign workers to staff their organizations. Canada is currently admitting over 250,000 immigrants every year, mainly under the Federal Skilled Worker category, which selects candidates based on education, training, and work experience.

Attorney David Cohen, of the Canadian immigration law firm of Campbell Cohen, believes that Canadian immigration has already reached a critical mass. "Immigrants are an integral part of what Canada is and what it is going to be," he states, highlighting that Canada has no choice but to encourage immigration to sustain the country. "The question on an economic, but more importantly, on a human level, is how to make their transition to Canada as smooth as possible." Of the view that the most important element to immigrant integration is finding meaningful work in Canada, Cohen raises the issue of accreditation and foreign skill recognition. "Foreign skills accreditation in Canada has not kept pace with rising immigration levels. Given the importance of immigrants to our country's economy, Canada will need to do better," states Cohen.

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