+1(514) 937-9445 or Toll-free (Canada & US) +1 (888) 947-9445

Application for Canadian Citizenship - A Comprehensive Guide

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
PART - 1

WARNING: LONG POST

Hello everyone!

Hope you are all doing good and staying safe in these uncertain times.

Its about time – A few people have been requesting me for a detailed post for citizenship (like my post on Express Entry / OINP HCPS). Also, it is almost my time to apply for citizenship (I’ll be applying later this year). Like always, I will do my best to be as correct and accurate as possible, if you find something to be incorrect, PLEASE let me know.

Since (unfortunately) I can't make this as a single post, I'll split it into 6 parts.

IMPORTANT:


This post covers the information required for adults to apply for regular citizenship. There are other processes like fast-track process for Armed Forces personnel and the like but they are out of the scope of this post.

If you are applying as a family and have a minor child, please follow the procedure to apply for citizenship for minor children IN ADDITION to the steps in this post.

Use this guide as a reference - I will provide links where necessary - It is important to actually open and read the links on the IRCC website. I cannot stress this enough.

Use this guide as a supplement to the IRCC's Instruction Guide . Like I did for my Express Entry post, I will split my post into phases.
  • Pre-Application Phase -> Getting ready to apply / Pre-requisites for submitting a citizenship application
  • Application Phase -> Filling out your application / Gathering Documents / Submitting your application package / Tips
  • Post-Application Phase -> AOR / Additional Document Requests / Test / Oath and next steps
Pre-Application Phase

Irrespective of how we first moved to Canada (student / work / PR / refugee) most of us who moved here have had a goal – applying for Canadian Citizenship. The time is nearing and it is important to understand the process in detail and try not to make any mistakes. The process is a little time consuming – do it once and do it right.

Let’s get to the basics.

Minimum requirements to be able to apply for citizenship:

1. Be a Permanent Resident of Canada

  • Your PR status must be in good standing (You should not have a fraud investigation / removal order or the like against you). In other words, your PR status should not be in question.
    • Note: If your PR card has expired, you can still apply. Your PR status is NOT affected if your PR card expires.
  • Naturally, you should have maintained your PR status by being physically present in Canada for at least 2 years in a 5-year period.
2. Time spent in Canada
  • Most people should have spent at least 3 years (1095 days) in a 5-year period (physically present in Canada) immediately preceding the date you are signing the citizenship application.
  • Every day spent inside Canada in the last 5 years (physically present in Canada) as a Permanent Resident counts as one day towards physical presence.
  • Every day spent inside Canada in the last 5 years (physically present in Canada) as a Temporary Resident (Student / Work Visa, for instance) can be calculated as half a day towards physical presence up to a maximum of 365 days only.
  • For instance:
    • Arthur came in on a work visa on Jan 02 2014.
    • He got his PR on Jan 03 2016. He never left the country.
    • The number of days as a temporary resident is 730 days.
    • He spends 2 years (730 days) in Canada as a permanent resident.
    • Arthur can sign and submit his citizenship application on Jan 04 2018.
    • He counts each day spent in Canada as a temporary resident as half a day (which amounts to 365 days) and he counts each day spent as a permanent resident as one day (which amounts to 730 days).
  • The physical presence calculator is a very handy tool to keep track of your travels and calculate physical presence. It is also mandatory that you keep a track of your travels here so that when it is your time to apply, you can print it and submit it with your application.
  • Note 1: If you crossed an international border and returned to Canada the same day, it counts as being physically present in Canada.
    • For instance, traveling to US in the morning for shopping and returning to Canada the same evening – this day does count towards physical presence.
    • It is important to note that you MUST STILL DISCLOSE these trips in your physical presence calculator.
  • Note 2: Similarly, while traveling internationally, the day you leave Canada and the day you return to Canada also counts towards your physical presence.
    • For instance, if you left Canada on September 14th and returned on October 5th, September 14th and October 5th will count towards your physical presence.
  • Stating the obvious but any day spent outside Canada does NOT count towards physical presence. However, as usual, there are some exceptions (doesn’t apply to the majority of us though).
  • Generally, time spent serving a sentence or probation DOES NOT count towards physical presence with some exceptions.
  • Do NOT apply with exactly 1095 days. That is the minimum requirement but it is recommended to apply with more days. I’ll explain why later in the post.
3. Filing income taxes in Canada

Here it comes – something that no one escapes!
  • You must have filed at least 3 tax returns in the last 5 years from the date you sign your citizenship application. Exceptions apply for very few people.
  • The large majority of us WILL NOT be exempt from this.
4. Language Skills
  • Applicants who are of ages 18 – 54 MUST submit proof to substantiate that they can listen and speak at least one of Canada’s 2 official languages English or French.
  • More about this later in the post.
 
 

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
PART - 2

Application Phase

Once you have established that you are eligible to apply, the next step is to download the application form and understand what documentation is required. This needs some serious scrutiny - the documents might slightly differ based on your personal circumstance.

I'll explain every section / field in the application form and if that section requires a documentation, I will provide more information on what has to be submitted for that section.

First things first - Download the application form for adults (CIT 0002)

At the time of writing this post - this is the direct link to the application form. Depending on when you are reading it, you might want to click on the link right after 'First things first' and get the latest form. You can't view the application form on the browser. So, download the form and then open it using Acrobat Reader.

Fill the application form

NOTE: You can always click the '?' next to the question in the application form to get more information.

Q1: In which language would you like to receive service?

  • Specify the language of your choice
Q2: Do you have special needs requiring accommodation? This might include wheelchair access, sign language interpretation, braille or large print reading material, or access for an assistant or seeing eye dog. If yes, please select the type of accommodation required.
  • Check 'Yes' if you have a special need and choose/enter relevant information. Otherwise, answer No.
Q3 (a): Have you applied for Canadian Citizenship before? If you submitted an application for citizenship that was returned to you as incomplete, answer "no" to this question.
  • If you applied for citizenship earlier, received AOR and were later rejected for any reason, mention YES. Otherwise, No.
  • If your application was returned for being incomplete, you must answer "No" to this question.
Q3 (b): What is your Client identification (ID) # or Unique Client Identifier
  • Provide your UCI.
  • This can be found on your PR card, COPR, your PR Visa or on your IRCC account that you applied for PR with.
Q3 (c): What date did you become a permanent resident of Canada (landed immigrant)? Copy the date that you became a permanent resident as it appears on your most recent immigration document: Permanent Resident Card (PR Card), or Confirmation of Permanent Residence or Record of Landing
  • Key in the date you became a permanent resident as indicated in the documents in the question.
  • Ensure that you use the correct format to enter the date as indicated in the form.
Q4 (a). What is your name as shown exactly on your most recent immigration document? Copy your name exactly as it appears on your most recent immigration document: Permanent Resident Card (PR Card), or Confirmation of Permanent Residence, or Record of Landing
  • Provide your legal Last Name and First Name as it appears on your PR card / COPR.
Q4 (b): Have you changed your name or gender designation since becoming a permanent resident?
  • Check the box according to your situation. If you changed your name after you landed as a PR, provide your new legal name here.
  • If your gender designation has changed, click on the Request for a Change of Sex or Gender Identifier for more information.
Q4 (c): Gender
  • Select your gender, enter your height and your natural eye color.
Q4 (d): What is your date of birth as shown exactly on your most recent immigration document? Copy your date of birth as it appears on your most recent immigration document: Permanent Resident Card (PR Card), or Confirmation of Permanent Residence, or Record of Landing.
Q4(e): What is your city/town and country or territory of birth?
  • Enter this information from your COPR.
  • If the 'PLACE OF BIRTH' is cut-off on your COPR (like mine), I believe it should be fine. Enter the full 'Place of Birth' as per your passport and explain this clearly in a Letter of Explanation.
Q5: List all names that you have used, including name at birth, previously married name(s), alias(es) and nicknames.
  • Whether you have a nickname / alias or not, everyone MUST answer this question with their name at birth.
  • If you have used an alias / nickname or any other kind of name, then answer truthfully.
Q6: Please indicate your marital status - are you:
  • Select your marital status.
Q7: How can we contact you about your application?
  • Enter your e-mail address, your home address, phone number and your mailing address if it is different from your home address.
Q8: Is someone helping you fill out this form and Are you paying someone to help you fill out this form? If yes, to either question above, complete the following details about the person helping you (enter First Name, Last Name and company name if applicable)
  • If you want IRCC to correspond with someone else other than you about your application - check the box accordingly, download, fill and include Use of a Representative Form (IMM 5476) form with your application.
Q9 (a): Are you eligible based on the Physical Presence Calculator to apply for a grant of citizenship? If you checked NO, you should wait until you meet the physical presence requirement before completing the application.
  • The physical presence calculator is a nice way to keep track of all your absences from Canada AND it is mandatory that you submit the final result from that application with your Citizenship application. This calculator also provides the '5-year eligibility date'.
  • Choose 'Online Physical Presence Calculator' next to 'I will provide a signed copy of'.
  • If you want to choose the other option (manually calculate if you match the physical presence, you may do so and refer to the appropriate link).
  • Enter the 5-year eligibility date as shown by the physical presence calculator it in the space provided.
Q9 (b): During your five (5) year eligibility period did you have Temporary Resident or Protected Person status in Canada before becoming a permanent resident?
  • Select either 'Yes' or 'No' based on your situation.
  • If you choose 'Yes', then fill the table below with the appropriate status and timeline.
Q9 (c): During your five (5) year eligibility period, did you live outside of Canada as a crown servant or with your spouse or common law partner or parent who was a crown servant? Find out who is a crown servant and the specific situations that apply in the help text or instruction guide.
  • This is not a very common situation. If this applies to you, follow the instructions in the application form.
 

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
PART - 3

Q10 (a): Please list all addresses inside and outside of Canada during your entire five (5) year eligibility period. Start with the most recent. If there are any missing days or periods of time, your application will be returned to you.
  • Enter all your addresses you've lived in throughout your 5-year eligibility period (inside and outside Canada). Start from the most recent one.
  • This includes the addresses you lived in your home country if you lived there for a part of the 5-year eligibility period.
  • You do NOT have to include the addresses of friends, family or hotels where you stayed if you went to a country on vacation.
  • DO NOT LEAVE ANY GAPS. The dates MUST BE CONTINUOUS. IF THERE ARE GAPS HERE, YOUR APPLICATION WILL BE RETURNED AS INCOMPLETE.
Q10 (b): In the past four (4) years, were you in a country or territory other than Canada for 183 days or more in a row (since the age of 18)?
  • Who should answer 'YES' to this?
    • Anybody who has resided in any country other than Canada for 6 months in a row in the past 4 years from the date you are signing your citizenship application should answer 'YES'.
    • This includes time you spent in your home country just before moving to Canada.
  • Who should answer 'No' to this?
    • If you did not spend 183 days in a row outside Canada in the past 4 years.
  • Who should (or should not) provide a police certificate?
    • The following is my understanding of who should submit police certificates. Whoever answers 'YES' above should either provide a PCC or an explanation as to why they aren't submitting their PCC.
    • A police certificate is only needed (or not needed) as demonstrated by the following examples. (NOTE: Country of origin is NOT the same as country of citizenship).
      • Example 1 -, Raj moved to Canada in June 2017. Assuming Raj signs the citizenship application on 09 October 2020, the "4-year period" would be from 08 October 2016 to 08 October 2020. Though Raj lived in India from 08 October 2016 to June 2017 (greater than 183 days), he does NOT have to provide a Police Certificate because he was in his country of origin immediately prior to establishing permanent residence. But he has to make an entry in the table and explain why he isn't providing a certificate - "Lived in country of origin immediately before establishing PR in Canada".
      • Example 2 - Let's assume that Raj (who is an Indian citizen), lived in the US from 08 October 2016 to June 2017). He applied and got Canadian PR when he was working in the US on H1-B visa. Even in this case, Raj does NOT have to produce a police certificate because US was his country of origin just before establishing his PR in Canada. But he has to make an entry in the table and explain why he isn't providing a certificate - "Lived in country of origin immediately before establishing PR in Canada".
      • Example 3 - Joseph landed in Canada as a PR in May 2017. Before he landed, he was an Indian citizen living in India. He remained in Canada till August 2017. He moved to Singapore for work related reasons from September 2017 to May 2018. He returned back to Canada in late May 2018. When applying for citizenship in October 2020, Joseph MUST submit a Police Certificate for Singapore but NOT for India. He has to make an entry in the table and explain why he isn't providing a certificate for India - "Lived in country of origin immediately before establishing PR in Canada". For Singapore, he needs to write something like "Please see attached Police Certificate for Singapore".
  • IRCC has worded it like this "Note: If you were in your country or territory of origin immediately prior to becoming a permanent resident and landing in Canada and this time falls within this four (4) year period, you are not required to provide a police certificate. Please indicate this in the explanation box."
  • If you have to submit a PCC:
    • Read How to get a police certificate.
    • The police certificate should have been issued:
      • After the last time you were in that country or territory (if you never visited that country again) OR
      • No more than 6 months before the date you sign your citizenship application
  • Note: Rules surrounding PCCs are different for minors. If you have minors in your application, check the Citizenship Instruction Guide for Minors
    • For minors, PCC is mandatory for all countries where they have lived in for a TOTAL (doesn't have to be in a row) of 183 days or more while the child was 14 years of age or older during the four 4 years immediately before the date of the minor's application.
Q11: Tell us what you have been doing during your five-year eligibility period, inside and outside of Canada. Enter details of your employment and education history below. Please include any period of unemployment, period of retirement, period working at home as a homemaker or being self employed. Be sure to provide information for the five-year eligibility period. Start with the most recent. If there are any missing days, periods of time or if the section is left blank, your application will be returned to you.
  • Start from your most recent gig.
  • You MUST include EVERYTHING you've been doing throughout your eligibility period (includes unemployment, self-employment, study, retirement or a homemaker).
  • DO NOT LEAVE ANY GAPS. The dates MUST BE CONTINUOUS. IF THERE ARE GAPS HERE, YOUR APPLICATION WILL BE RETURNED AS INCOMPLETE.
Q12 (a): Do you have a Social Insurance Number (SIN), Temporary Tax Number (TTN), and/or Individual Tax Number (ITN)?
  • Most applicants would answer 'Yes' to this. If you answer YES, provide your SIN/TTN/ITN that you use to file taxes.
Q12 (b): Tell us when you filed your income taxes in the last five (5) years using the chart below.
  • Enter the tax year and indicate:
    • If you were required to file for the particular year AND
    • If you actually filed the taxes
  • NOTE: DO NOT leave a blank box here. You MUST mention all 5 years in your eligibility period even if you were not present in Canada for a part of those 5 years.
Q12 (c): SIN, ITN OR TTN RELEASE TO THE CANADA REVENUE AGENCY (CRA)
  • You MUST agree and provide consent for IRCC to use and disclose your SIN so that they can pull the tax information from CRA.
  • If you do not provide consent or you do not fill this information, your application will be considered incomplete and will be returned to you.
Q13: Do you currently, or have you ever held immigration or citizenship status in a country or territory other than Canada (this includes your country of birth)?
  • The vast majority of us would have to answer 'Yes' to this question (unless you were stateless your whole life up until this point).
  • This includes country of birth so don't forget that.
  • Enter the country, status, date you obtained that status and if that status is current or expired.
Q14 (a): Have you held travel documents and/or passports during your five (5) year eligibility period?
  • Again, most of us would have to answer 'Yes' to this question.
  • If you answered 'Yes', fill out the details of your travel document in Table A.
  • NOTE 1: You will be asked to show the original of this document (This usually happens before / after your citizenship test AND possibly when checking documents before oath ceremony).
  • NOTE 2: If you have gaps between your travel document in the past 5 years OR if you did NOT have a passport during this time, explain in Table B.
  • If Table B doesn't apply to you, I would suggest writing "N/A".
Q14 (b): I hereby give my consent to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) to disclose the details of my history of travel to IRCC in order to assist IRCC in determining my citizenship eligibility. I also hereby authorize IRCC to collect the history of my travel from the CBSA.
  • While you can answer 'No' to this question, I STRONGLY RECOMMEND answering 'Yes' unless you have a very good reason not to.
  • If you answer 'No', you will be asked for additional documentation later in the process which, in my opinion, would be a waste of time.
  • You do not have to contact CBSA for this purpose, it is done for you by IRCC.
Q15 (a): If you are between 18 and 54 years of age, do you have proof of knowledge of English or French?
  • Check 'Yes' or 'No'.
  • 15 (a) also asks“Did you successfully complete the LINC or CUC courses at CLB 4/NCLC 4 or higher from January 1, 2008 to October 31, 2012?"
    • If this applies to you, answer accordingly.
Q15 (b): I am hearing impaired, which prevents me from submitting the proof of language described in 15A with my application.
  • If you answer 'YES' to this, you must submit proof.
Q15 (c): I have a disorder, disability or condition that is cognitive, psychiatric or psychological in nature which prevents me from submitting proof of language with my application.
  • If you answer 'YES' to this, you must submit proof.
 
Last edited:

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
PART - 4

Q16: This covers prohibitions. Give Situations that may prevent you from becoming a Canadian citizen a read.
  • There are 9 questions and 15 check boxes under Q16. If any of these apply to you, I strongly suggest that you discuss with an Immigration attorney before you submit your application.
Q16 (a): I have read and understand the prohibitions under the Citizenship Act
  • Check the box to indicate that you have read and understood the prohibitions. Everyone MUST check this box.
Q16 (b): If you have checked "YES" to any of the questions listed above, provide details. You may need to provide fingerprints and/or court documents and/ or attend an in-person interview to make sure you are not prohibited under the Citizenship Act
  • If you checked 'YES' for any of the 15 check boxes under Q16, provide details here. Otherwise, write N/A.
Q17: Consent to Disclose Personal Information after you acquire citizenship
  • This question has 3 parts to it - Whatever you answer here will NOT change the outcome of the application so I am not going to elaborate on it.
  • However, please check 'YES' OR 'NO'. Do not leave these questions unanswered.
Q18: SIGNATURE OF APPLICANT
  • Very important. Please do NOT forget to sign your application.
  • Also, very important - You should be eligible for citizenship on the day BEFORE you sign and date your application.
  • Do NOT post-date the application. If your application is post-dated, it will be returned to you.
  • The date printed here must NOT be more than 90 days old when IRCC receives it. In other words, your application should reach IRCC before 90 days from the date the application was signed.
That completes our citizenship application. Next step is to collect documents.

Gather your documents

Now that you have filled your Application form, you'd have to gather your documents to support the information provided. Let's discuss about what needs to be submitted below. Use this section as a supplement to the IRCC's Document Checklist.

1. The Citizenship application form (CIT 0002)
  • You MUST submit the application form that we filled in the previous step.
  • Once again, DO NOT FORGET TO DATE AND SIGN YOUR APPLICATION.
  • Also, do NOT forget that you should be eligible the day before the date mentioned in your application.
  • Do NOT post-date the application.
2. The Online Physical Presence Calculator (OR) How to Calculate Physical Presence (CIT 0407)
  • Like I mentioned in the previous section, the online physical presence calculator is much easier to work with instead of trying to calculate manually.
  • You would have to create an account if you don't already have it.
  • Once you key in all the information, the physical presence calculator provides you with two things:
    • Your eligibility period, which you would have to enter in your Citizenship application form.
    • It'll also give you the total number of days you've been present in Canada and will tell you if you meet the physical presence requirement or not.
  • DO NOT FORGET TO SIGN AND DATE THE PHYSICAL PRESENCE CALCULATOR SHEET.
3. Photocopies of all biographical pages of Passport / Travel Document
  • You have to submit biographical pages of ALL YOUR PASSPORTS COVERING THE ENTIRETY OF YOUR ELIGIBILITY PERIOD.
  • If you held multiple passports during your 5-year eligibility period (for instance, if your passport was renewed during this time and you got a new passport), you MUST submit the biographical pages of both passports.
  • If you have a passport whose validity was extended by placing an extension stamp on your passport, you MUST submit the passport page containing the extension stamp as well.
4. Photocopy of proof that demonstrates adequate knowledge of English OR French (for applicants between 18 and 54 years of age).
  • There are NUMEROUS documents you can submit as proof. See what documents you can use as language proof.
  • The most commonly used documents are below:
    • Photocopy of IELTS Test report used for immigration (4 or higher in speaking and 4.5 or higher in listening is required) - EVEN IF IT IS EXPIRED
    • Photocopy of "degree, diploma, certificate or official transcripts from a secondary or post-secondary education program showing you studied in English or French, in Canada or abroad.
      • If these documents are not in English then, additionally, you have to submit "a letter from the school showing that the language of instruction was in English or French (including an official translation of the original document" AND "the address and contact information (phone number) of the education institution"
5. Photocopy of personal identification document
  • You MUST submit TWO PIECES OF PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION.
  • You can use any of the following documents as personal identification.
    • a copy of the biographical page of your passport/travel document
    • health insurance card
    • driver’s licence
    • senior citizen identification card
    • age of majority card
    • foreign identity documents, such as a passport or government issued identification documents
  • From what I understand, the most common pieces of identification would be your driver's license and health card.
  • NOTE 1: You CANNOT SUBMIT PR CARD AS AN IDENTIFICATION DOCUMENT.
  • NOTE 2: If there is information on both sides of your ID, PRINT BOTH SIDES OF THE ID.
6. Citizenship Photos
7. Fees Receipt
  • The fee for an adult is CAD 630 and CAD 100 for a child.
  • Pay your fees online
  • From the above link, select your application type, enter quantity, login and pay the fee.
  • You can pay the fee online using Credit cards (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, JCB, UnionPay).
  • You can also pay using some debit cards (Visa Debit AND Debit cards that use Interac + are registered for online banking <Canadian Debit cards only>)
  • You can also use pre-paid cards. If you do use them, keep them for the next 18 months (in case your fee needs to be returned).
  • NOTE: Once you pay the fee and receive the receipt via e-mail, DO NOT FORGET TO SUBMIT THIS RECEIPT AS A PART OF YOUR APPLICATION PACKAGE.
8. The Document Checklist
  • Finally, you MUST submit the document checklist as a part of your application package. The document checklist here is for Adult Citizenship applicants. If you have minors in the application, then you might want to download the appropriate document (I have hyperlinked this at the top of this post - Just search for 'minor').
  • The first 8 documents specified in the document checklist are MANDATORY for everybody. The documents we've discussed in this section so far are all mandatory documents.
  • There are 9 other documents which you must submit if it applies to you.
    • If ANY of your documents are NOT in English or French, you must get those documents translated, notarized AND INCLUDE BOTH THE ORIGINAL AND THE TRANSLATED VERSIONS as a part of your application package. You must check the 'Translations' document in case you are submitting translated copies.
    • If you are to submit police certificates, then you must check the 'Original Police Certificates or Clearances'. YOU MUST SUBMIT YOUR ORIGINAL POLICE CERTIFICATE AND NOT A PHOTOCOPY.
  • Likewise, if any of the other situation applies to you, you must check those boxes and submit appropriate documents.
9. Letter of Explanation
  • This is a very powerful tool - use it properly.
  • In case you would like to clarify / provide more explanation about a document or any content in the application form, use a letter of explanation.
  • Be to the point and precise - Explain your situation clearly.
  • Be polite in your tone.
 

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
PART - 5

Prepare and send your application package
  • Neatly arrange documents, section-wise. The following is my recommendation but feel free to suit yourself.
    • Have the document checklist as your first document
    • Place your photos in a small envelope, mark the envelope with "Photos" and attach this to the document checklist using paper clip.
    • Use paper clips to bind documents of a particular section together. For example, you would use a paperclip to hold all the biographical pages of passport. Likewise, you'll use another paper clip to hold your identification documents together.
    • Triple check that you have all the documents AND the contents of your application form - Have a friend or a family member verify this for you.
    • DO NOT STAPLE YOUR DOCUMENTS TOGETHER.
  • Your application package should contain the following (mandatory):
    • Document Checklist
    • Photos in a small envelope attached to the document checklist with paperclip
    • Citizenship application form, signed and dated
    • Physical presence calculator, signed and dated
    • Photocopies of biological pages of passport(s)/travel documents
    • Photocopy of identity documents
    • Photocopy of language proof
    • Fee receipt
  • Your application package might also contain the following (if it applies to you):
    • Letter of Explanation (if it applies to you)
    • Original Police certificates (if it applies to you)
    • Translations (if it applies to you) - Submit both original version of the document AND the translation
    • Other supporting documents, if they apply to you, as mentioned in the document checklist
  • I would recommend placing all the documents inside a transparent plastic folder before placing it inside an envelope.
  • If you are sending the application for you and your family, you can include all applications in a single envelope.
    • Note: If even one document is missing for one family member, the entire envelope will be returned back to the applicant.
If you are sending it via courier - Send it to:

Case Processing Centre-Sydney GRANTS Adults
49 Dorchester Street
Sydney, Nova Scotia B1P 522
If you are sending it by regular mail - Send it to:

Case Processing Centre-Sydney GRANTS Adults
P.O. Box 7000 SYDNEY. NS B1P 6V6
Tip: Pre-Application and Application Phase
  1. DO NOT submit your application with exactly 1095 days.
    • In case you make a mistake, even inadvertently, your application will be refused AND you will NOT receive your processing fee back.
    • I strongly recommend having a buffer period of at least 2 - 3 months (1115 days minimum)
    • If IRCC has the slightest doubt about your residency, you might get additional documentation request which is a pain the rear.
    • More on this in the next section.
 
Last edited:
 

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
PART - 6

Post-Application Phase

You have now submitted your Citizenship application. If you paid close attention to the guide and prepared a killer application package - the chances of you getting your application back is very less to none.

The hard part begins now - Waiting! In this initial stage after submission, you'd have to wait for AOR.

What can you do while you wait?

It generally takes about 2 months from the date they receive the application for you to get a AOR. (This can vary slightly from person to person). While you wait for AOR (and for further steps after you receive AOR), you can do the following -
Routine vs Non-Routine Applications and Additional document requests

Your citizenship application could be processed in 2 different ways - Routine and Non-Routine.
What happens during application processing?

At the time of writing this post, the "official" processing time is 12 months. In reality, however - It ranges anywhere between 6 months to Forever. A sizable portion of the applications are processed between 6 - 9 months time.
The basic consensus of how a citizenship application might progress is explained below. This might vary slightly between applicants but this should give you a general idea. There is some speculation here and I am paraphrasing this from one of dpenabill's post and other posts in this forum.
  • CPC-Sydney issues an AOR after the completeness-checking the application package
  • A file is opened in GCMS (simultaneously).
  • The application is sent for background checks
    • Criminality checks are done by RCMP
    • Security checks are done by CSIS
    • GCMS checks are done by IRCC
  • CPC-Sydney might do some additional processing (?)
  • Application is forwarded to the local visa office for further processing
  • Local Visa Office (LVO) checks and verifies the authenticity of the information / documents in the application package
  • LVO sends Notice to appear for citizenship test and interview
  • LVO sends a Notice to appear for Citizenship Ceremony (Oath)
After the oath: Next Steps

You are officially a Canadian Citizen after you take the oath of citizenship.
  • Official sources state that you need to wait a minimum of 2 business days before you can apply for a Canadian Passport.
  • However, in reality, you can apply for a passport as soon as your ECAS status changes to 'Complete' and this can happen before 2 business days.
Closing notes

Canadian Citizenship is a privilege and not a right. Let's embrace it, respect it and let's never abuse it. NEVER lie on an immigration / citizenship application - It is not worth the consequences.

I hope that the mods make this a sticky thread for easy access. Let's further discuss about the nuances of this process and help each other in this beautiful journey of becoming a citizen of this great nation.

-rajkamalmohanram
 
Last edited:

Stuntxd9

Hero Member
May 4, 2015
408
102
Visa Office......
KNGVO
App. Filed.......
April 2016
LANDED..........
Feb 2017
This is really an amazing post but the issue im having is with the pcc for minor as im getting different answers. My child is 16 yrs old and became a PR Dec 2019. She has never been to another country other than Canada after receiving her PR. Does she still need to get a pcc from her country of origin
 
  • Like
Reactions: rajkamalmohanram

navid2014

Hero Member
Jul 9, 2014
515
155
This is really an amazing post but the issue im having is with the pcc for minor as im getting different answers. My child is 16 yrs old and became a PR Dec 2019. She has never been to another country other than Canada after receiving her PR. Does she still need to get a pcc from her country of origin
Quote from below post,

Who needs a police certificate?
You and any family member 18 or older may need to get a police certificate, depending on the program you’re applying to.


https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/application/medical-police/police-certificates/about.html
 
 

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
This is really an amazing post but the issue im having is with the pcc for minor as im getting different answers. My child is 16 yrs old and became a PR Dec 2019. She has never been to another country other than Canada after receiving her PR. Does she still need to get a pcc from her country of origin
For minors, looks like there are different requirements.

https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/application/application-forms-guides/guide-0003-application-canadian-citizenship-minors-under-18-years.html

Police certificate(s) (as required)

You are required to provide a police certificate for each country where your child was present for a total of 183 days or more while the child was 14 years of age or older during the four (4) years immediately before the date of your child’s application. Consult How to get a police certificate (police check) for specific and up-to-date information on how to obtain police certificates from any country.
You MUST submit a PCC in your case for your daughter.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Stuntxd9

karens

Hero Member
Jul 15, 2017
209
62
Hi @rajkamalmohanram , first off thank you so much for investing your time and compiling such a wonderful post.

I do have couple of queries on the Citizenship form, if you could help me on the same, it would be of great help. Thank you in advance.

Question 05:
I have filled only "Name at birth", since I have never changed my name in my life. The other 2 rows are filled with N/A. Or should I leave them blank ?



Question 10:
I have filled all the non-relevant rows with N/A. Or should I leave them blank ?


Question 11:
Same query as Q10, about filling N/A in non-relevant fields.


Question 12:
This is for a friend, she landed in 2017, so for 2015 and 2016, she was not even a PR to file taxes. So is her fill-up correct on the form ?


Question 13:
Another query for my friend, she is asking if she can write her Birth month & year in the "Date obtained/effective" field ? For her Indian Citizenship proof, she only has her Indian Passport (valid from 2014 till 2024) with her, is that sufficient ?


Question 14:
Last query for my friend, does she need to write about her Canada PR as well on the table or just about her Indian Passport is enough? And yes, about filling the non-relevant rows with N/A.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zulaikha

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
Hi @rajkamalmohanram , first off thank you so much for investing your time and compiling such a wonderful post.

I do have couple of queries on the Citizenship form, if you could help me on the same, it would be of great help. Thank you in advance.

Question 05:
I have filled only "Name at birth", since I have never changed my name in my life. The other 2 rows are filled with N/A. Or should I leave them blank ?


Per my understanding, you just can't leave an entire table empty. However, if you have one row in a table filled and the other rows are empty, it is generally understood that the applicant has no further information to input in that table - the information would be considered complete; Simply put, in this table, since you have at least one row, you do NOT have to write N/A in all these fields IMO.

Question 10
:
I have filled all the non-relevant rows with N/A. Or should I leave them blank ?


My answer to question 5 applies here too.

Question 11
:
Same query as Q10, about filling N/A in non-relevant fields.


My answers to question 5 and 10 apply here too.

Question 12
:
This is for a friend, she landed in 2017, so for 2015 and 2016, she was not even a PR to file taxes. So is her fill-up correct on the form ?


Yup, this looks good. I have explicitly mentioned in my post.

NOTE: DO NOT leave a blank box here. You MUST mention all 5 years in your eligibility period even if you were not present in Canada for a part of those 5 years.


Question 13
:
Another query for my friend, she is asking if she can write her Birth month & year in the "Date obtained/effective" field ? For her Indian Citizenship proof, she only has her Indian Passport (valid from 2014 till 2024) with her, is that sufficient ?


Yup. If citizenship was obtained at birth, then she must enter her birth month and year in the 'Date Obtained / Effective Date' field.

Question 14
:
Last query for my friend, does she need to write about her Canada PR as well on the table or just about her Indian Passport is enough? And yes, about filling the non-relevant rows with N/A.


Generally speaking, travel documents = passports. In this case, IRCC is actually looking for information from all the passports held during the eligibility period. If she only held one Indian passport during this time, then information about that passport alone is sufficient.
 
  • Like
Reactions: karens

karens

Hero Member
Jul 15, 2017
209
62
Thank you @rajkamalmohanram.
One of my other friends who landed in Mar 2018, she would complete 3-years on Mar-2021 but she would have filed only 2-years of Tax by then, till when would she need to wait for being eligible for Citizenship? Till May-2021 I guess or?
Thanks in advance.
 
 

rajkamalmohanram

VIP Member
Apr 29, 2015
15,802
5,544
Thank you @rajkamalmohanram.
One of my other friends who landed in Mar 2018, she would complete 3-years on Mar-2021 but she would have filed only 2-years of Tax by then, till when would she need to wait for being eligible for Citizenship? Till May-2021 I guess or?
Thanks in advance.
Most forms required for tax filing are available by February, latest by March. If the return is filed electronically, CRA issues NOA in about 2 weeks from the date return was filed.

As soon as your friend receives the NOA, I believe she should be good to go (provided she meets the physical presence and other criteria at the time).
 
  • Like
Reactions: karens

Aneelareddy

Newbie
May 9, 2020
2
0
Hello everyone,

I need some help in answering my questions regarding calculating my physical presence in Canada for my Citizenship as 1) Student 2) Work permit 3) PR
I have tried calculating on cic website, but I am little bit confused about some days (No legal status for 6 months, between my work permit expiration and Pr Landing)
Here are my dates in Canada and the date I became PR on 28 June 2018 Valid Until 30 August 2023

1) 01 Jan 2013 to 05 Jan 2015 on Student permit (0 days absence)
2) 05 Jan 2015 to 01 Jan 2018 on Work permit (Around 120 days absence)
3) 06 Jan 2018 to 12 June 2018 - NO LEGAL STATUS (As my work permit extension rejected, Pr application was in processing and Pr confirmation letter received on June 12, 2018)
4) 28 June 2018 to 27 Nov, 2018 (0 absence)
5) 28 Nov 2018 to 15 July 2019 (OUT OF CANADA)
6) 16 July 2019 to 17 Nov, 2019 (0 absence)
7) 18 Nov 2019 to 30 April 2020 (OUT OF CANADA)
8) 1 May 2020 till date..............

Can someone help answering the questions below:
1) Will the NO LEGAL STATUS days be counted?
2) I see On CIC calculator as Only the five (5) years immediately before the date of your application are considered for calculating the physical presence requirement this - If I apply for my Citizenship in 2023, will I loose my days as STUDENT & WORKER days accumulated before 2018? ( I supposed to get 365 days)
3) Is there any advantage for students graduated in Canada, Worked on Work permit, & became PR. Or is it the same 1095 for everyone?
4) Since my family living in USA I am not able to stay continuously in Canada. Will there be any impact on my application?

When I calculated the eligibility in this website, it showed me I am eligible by July 2021, So I am really looking forward to stay and complete my days if its right as shown. Please help me clarify the confusion with this.

I would really appreciate some advice, suggestions on this

Thankyou
Anee
 
Last edited: