+1(514) 937-9445 or Toll-free (Canada & US) +1 (888) 947-9445

ALL U.S. ASPIRANTS LET'S CONNECT HERE WHO WANTS CANADIAN PR/CITIZENSHIP

bear4242

Newbie
Nov 10, 2016
2
0
OK, I'll start. :)

I work as a cybersecurity research analyst/security architect for a U.S. company. My work is 99.9% remote. I own property in Nova Scotia - that I have just purchased as a "safe harbor". I plan on working for at least 5 more years - the work is physically non-demanding and I really enjoy it. I will also start collecting my social security pension next month.

Because of my age (66) - I have been told that it will be difficult for me to gain any kind of residency status. I'd like to know if that is true.

If it IS true, what are the restrictions about leaving and re-entering the country to "re-set" the 180 day clock cycle.

Thanks to all for whatever information you can provide!
 

scylla

VIP Member
Jun 8, 2010
64,593
8,841
Toronto
Category........
Visa Office......
Buffalo
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
28-05-2010
AOR Received.
19-08-2010
File Transfer...
28-06-2010
Passport Req..
01-10-2010
VISA ISSUED...
05-10-2010
LANDED..........
05-10-2010
bear4242 said:
OK, I'll start. :)

I work as a cybersecurity research analyst/security architect for a U.S. company. My work is 99.9% remote. I own property in Nova Scotia - that I have just purchased as a "safe harbor". I plan on working for at least 5 more years - the work is physically non-demanding and I really enjoy it. I will also start collecting my social security pension next month.

Because of my age (66) - I have been told that it will be difficult for me to gain any kind of residency status. I'd like to know if that is true.

If it IS true, what are the restrictions about leaving and re-entering the country to "re-set" the 180 day clock cycle.

Thanks to all for whatever information you can provide!
Your property isn't really a "safe harbour" since you're not allowed to move to Canada or live here. Yes - unfortunately your age is going to make the process of obtaining PR next to impossible. And unfortunately has no retiree immigration class. If you have children who are Canadian citizens or PRs - they might be able to sponsor you. If you have several million you can invest in a business in Canada - that might also get you PR. Otherwise you really don't have any realistic options due to your age.

The 180 day thing isn't going to work for very long. Again, you're not allowed to live in Canada - you can only visit. If you try to live in Canada as a visitor by exiting and re-entering every 180 days to re-set the six months - sooner or later CBSA officers will stop you from re-entering and tell you that you have to stop living in Canada without authorization. If they really think you've abused the system - they may even ban you from re-entering for a year. Generally speaking - if you want to avoid issues - you should spend more time outside of Canada than inside of Canada each year.

Also, keep in mind that you won't be covered by Canada's health care system while you are here. If you plan to visit, make sure you take out private insurance to cover emergencies (if you have to pay for emergency health care yourself here, it's extremely expensive). Also, private insurance typically only covers emergency care. You'll have to pay for everything else (e.g. regular check ups, medication) out of your own pocket.
 

scylla

VIP Member
Jun 8, 2010
64,593
8,841
Toronto
Category........
Visa Office......
Buffalo
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
28-05-2010
AOR Received.
19-08-2010
File Transfer...
28-06-2010
Passport Req..
01-10-2010
VISA ISSUED...
05-10-2010
LANDED..........
05-10-2010
Sorry - there is one more possible option for you that I neglected to mention. If you have a Canadian spouse or common law partner - they would be able to sponsor you for PR. Obviously the relationship has to be genuine (take it from those of us who have gone through the process and had to submit a mountain of proof).

BTW: A common law partner is someone who you have physically lived with for at least one full year.
 

jes_ON

VIP Member
Jun 22, 2009
12,006
1,307
Category........
Visa Office......
New York
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
06-May-2010
AOR Received.
13-Aug-2010
File Transfer...
01-Mar-2011
Passport Req..
30-Jun-2011
VISA ISSUED...
12-Jul-2011 (received 25-Jul-2011)
LANDED..........
03-Sep-2011
bear4242 said:
I work as a cybersecurity research analyst/security architect for a U.S. company. My work is 99.9% remote. I own property in Nova Scotia - that I have just purchased as a "safe harbor". I plan on working for at least 5 more years - the work is physically non-demanding and I really enjoy it. I will also start collecting my social security pension next month.

Because of my age (66) - I have been told that it will be difficult for me to gain any kind of residency status. I'd like to know if that is true.

As a working professional, yes - it will be difficult, since you're one year away from retirement age. Regardless of your age, if you were able to find a Canadian employer willing to apply for an LMIA for you, that would be a path to later permanent residence. I haven't heard of LMIA/work permits being refused because of age...

Alternatives: People with lots of money can buy their way in as "investors." There is the family class option - have you looked at MapleMatch.com (or any of the dozen or so other dating websites)? LOL.


If it IS true, what are the restrictions about leaving and re-entering the country to "re-set" the 180 day clock cycle.

Umm... Not sure about this. Probably safest to think of it in similar terms (or the reverse) as Snowbirds. When Canadian snowbirds go to the USA, they are tolerated for up to 6 months (cumulative) without triggering any residency questions. You would need a different haven for the other 6 months.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/canadian-snowbirds-rules-you-need-to-know-1.2925513

On the other hand - A few years back, I had a Canadian friend who would fly back to Canada once every 6 months for a week, so that she could stay with her student partner... took her two years to get a work permit to stay, but was never refused re-entry to the US. Rules are fairly well harmonized between the two countries, so you might try it, keeping in mind that things change, esp. with better electronic tracking.

RE your work - as long as none of your clients are Canadian, working remotely while "visiting" would not require a work permit.
 

juergens

Member
Nov 1, 2008
18
0
I just posted on another topic but did study in Canada for one year (M.B.A.). Due to a family health issue, I had to return to the U.S. and never had an opportunity to do any post-graduate work in Canada. My post-graduate work permit expired and without a job in Canada at the time, was not able to extend it.

My background has been in educational technology, some teaching of freshman level IT related courses, and lots of experience in instructional design, assessment development, and instructional technology, and distance education. Not exactly a specialized field but I do have tons of experience in it. The other part of the equation is that I am 56 years old. Even if I were 30, the express entry points are really geared for those with job offers. Not too many employers are willing to offer a job to someone and then wait out several months for the paperwork. So where to find a job that seeks my qualifications and is willing to wait?

I should also acknowledge that my desire to move to Canada has nothing to do with the recent election. I started this process years ago. Needless to say that I am still in the U.S.A.