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Citizenship by decent

Lemonsqueevey

Newbie
Aug 9, 2020
7
0
Hi,
My grandmother was born in Canada in 1937, and wasn’t a crown servant. My dad was born in the UK and never applied for dual citizenship (however his brother has it). If my dad applied for citizenship through decent now, could I then apply for citizenship through decent? Or would he have had to had his proof of citizenship when I was born?
Does anyone know? Thanks!
 

Mike263

Hero Member
Jun 2, 2020
209
93
Hi,
My grandmother was born in Canada in 1937, and wasn’t a crown servant. My dad was born in the UK and never applied for dual citizenship (however his brother has it). If my dad applied for citizenship through decent now, could I then apply for citizenship through decent? Or would he have had to had his proof of citizenship when I was born?
Does anyone know? Thanks!
Your best bet is to call ircc client support centre (1-888-242-2100). They'll give you the correct information.
 

primaprime

VIP Member
Apr 6, 2019
3,401
867
Your best bet is to call ircc client support centre (1-888-242-2100). They'll give you the correct information.
The call centre is actually known for giving out incorrect information every now and again. It's pretty clear that citizenship is generally only passed on to the first generation born abroad.
 

Lemonsqueevey

Newbie
Aug 9, 2020
7
0
The call centre is actually known for giving out incorrect information every now and again. It's pretty clear that citizenship is generally only passed on to the first generation born abroad.
Thanks for your reply. My younger cousin has dual citizenship, and she is a 2nd generation born outside of Canada. But I don’t know if her application was before 2009 when I think some things changed.
 

primaprime

VIP Member
Apr 6, 2019
3,401
867
Yes, the law changed in 2009 to tighten the requirements. Typically to receive citizenship by descent now as the second generation born abroad the parent must have obtained their proof of citizenship before the birth of the child.
 

mashulia_26

Hero Member
Apr 6, 2018
330
92
Hi,
My grandmother was born in Canada in 1937, and wasn’t a crown servant. My dad was born in the UK and never applied for dual citizenship (however his brother has it). If my dad applied for citizenship through decent now, could I then apply for citizenship through decent? Or would he have had to had his proof of citizenship when I was born?
Does anyone know? Thanks!
You would be considered the second generation born abroad even if your dad applies for his citizenship and gets it.
 

alphazip

Champion Member
May 23, 2013
1,309
135
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Hi,
My grandmother was born in Canada in 1937, and wasn’t a crown servant. My dad was born in the UK and never applied for dual citizenship (however his brother has it). If my dad applied for citizenship through decent now, could I then apply for citizenship through decent? Or would he have had to had his proof of citizenship when I was born?
Does anyone know? Thanks!
Until 1977, Canadian citizenship was passed on through birth abroad to a Canadian citizen father in wedlock (or mother out of wedlock). There were also other requirements, which included registration. After 1977, there was a provision where your father could have received a grant of citizenship (for children of Canadian mothers), which would have made you a citizen if you were born after your father received the grant. The ability to apply for such a grant ended in 2004. As of 2009, your father became a Canadian citizen by descent, but you did not, because the new law stopped citizenship after the first generation born abroad. In summary, you could have received citizenship if your father had applied for a grant between 1977 and 2004, but it would have had to be before you were born.
 

Lemonsqueevey

Newbie
Aug 9, 2020
7
0
Until 1977, Canadian citizenship was passed on through birth abroad to a Canadian citizen father in wedlock (or mother out of wedlock). There were also other requirements, which included registration. After 1977, there was a provision where your father could have received a grant of citizenship (for children of Canadian mothers), which would have made you a citizen if you were born after your father received the grant. The ability to apply for such a grant ended in 2004. As of 2009, your father became a Canadian citizen by descent, but you did not, because the new law stopped citizenship after the first generation born abroad. In summary, you could have received citizenship if your father had applied for a grant between 1977 and 2004, but it would have had to be before you were born.
Thank you! This was really helpful and clear. Permanent residency application it is then...