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Any Ecuadorians apply inland? Question for Official documents issued by this country must be government-certified true copies

MissingYou34

Newbie
Aug 24, 2020
2
1
Hello,

Any Ecuadorians or country with similar requirements for documents how did you apply inland with this requirement? Official documents issued by this country must be government-certified true copies

We tried approaching the Ecuadorian Embassy in Toronto to make certified true copies and they had no idea what we were talking about, any advise or help from those that applied? How did you certify your documents (Passport, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate etc..)

Thank you for your time,
 
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clue12

Full Member
Jul 1, 2020
31
7
Hello,

Any Ecuadorians or country with similar requirements for documents how did you apply inland with this requirement? Official documents issued by this country must be government-certified true copies

We tried approaching the Ecuadorian Embassy in Toronto to make certified true copies and they had no idea what we were talking about, any advise or help from those that applied? How did you certify your documents (Passport, Birth Certificate, Marriage Certificate etc..)

Thank you for your time,
Hi! Did you ever find an answer for this question? I'm facing the same issue - an immigration consultant suggested to me that all this means is that the documents should have an official signature and stamp on them, but would love to hear if you got any different advice!
 
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Angelimarb

Newbie
Jan 17, 2020
7
4
Hi Guys,
I am from Venezuela, I got certified true copies of all my documents back in Venezuela and either I did certify them at Canadian embassy in Venezuela. None of this were useful for anything. As you cannot send out your original documents with your application, you must sent certified true copy of them by Canadian notary, lawyer, or authority. Make sure you bring all of them translated to English, and go to any notarial office in your city. There are free services for people under 30,000 per year, research in your area or pay the fees in the closest notary. Let me know if you have any other question. Have a nice day.
 

Thekitchen232

Newbie
Nov 2, 2020
8
0
Hi! Did you ever find an answer for this question? I'm facing the same issue - an immigration consultant suggested to me that all this means is that the documents should have an official signature and stamp on them, but would love to hear if you got any different advice!
The copies you get from Civil Registry are considered certified copies (they have a certificate number that is valid for 2 months), only thing you have to certify is the police certificate and the Ecuadorian embassy can certify this along with a copy of your passport.
It's less stressful then it sounds.
 

clue12

Full Member
Jul 1, 2020
31
7
The copies you get from Civil Registry are considered certified copies (they have a certificate number that is valid for 2 months), only thing you have to certify is the police certificate and the Ecuadorian embassy can certify this along with a copy of your passport.
It's less stressful then it sounds.
Thanks! I am actually getting a police certificate from Panama, so it may be a little different, although both Panama and Ecuador list the requirement that
  • Official documents issued by this country must be government-certified true copies (copies certified as authentic by the issuing governmental authority, signed and sealed).
This is the part I'm not sure about. Is it enough that the document has a signature and a stamp from the Director de Investigacion Judicial and Secretaria who issued it, or do these signatures need to be legalized and authenticated through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Canadian Consulate? The only other option to "certify" something in Panama is to get an apostille, but since Canada does not use apostille, I don't know if this would be the correct thing to do.
 
 

Thekitchen232

Newbie
Nov 2, 2020
8
0
Thanks! I am actually getting a police certificate from Panama, so it may be a little different, although both Panama and Ecuador list the requirement that
  • Official documents issued by this country must be government-certified true copies (copies certified as authentic by the issuing governmental authority, signed and sealed).
This is the part I'm not sure about. Is it enough that the document has a signature and a stamp from the Director de Investigacion Judicial and Secretaria who issued it, or do these signatures need to be legalized and authenticated through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Canadian Consulate? The only other option to "certify" something in Panama is to get an apostille, but since Canada does not use apostille, I don't know if this would be the correct thing to do.
It's not enough,
Get it legalized through ministry of foreign affairs who will confirm the signature is real. The canadian embassy step is not necessary.