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Proof of genuine relationship, haven't lived together for long - Spousal sponsorship

heyhowareyou

Member
Jul 12, 2020
12
1
I was reading a thread about submitting material to prove the relationship is genuine and some of the more credible things include joint bank statements, bills, proof of common address etc. I and my partner don't have such proof as we are both self-sufficient students in different countries (the US and Canada) and never lived together long enough to have those things. The longest we've lived together is 4 months but it was by a family so the evidence is scarce, so again no luck.

We do have a lot of itineraries proving we have been visiting each other (more than 20-30 I'd say), traveled bunch of places around the world together, an infinite amount of pictures (both alone and with all of our families), lots of chats and such, but I've read these are lower priority evidence.

My common sense tells me that an average person reviewing this application will have no doubt the relationship is genuine, but I don't know what would an immigration officer reviewing it expect. Does anyone have a similar experience (haven't lived together for too long and lacking such evidence) and can share their experience? Is a lack of such evidence a deal-breaker and can cause issues with the application?
P.S. I'm trying to avoid an interview because I would have to travel to my home country to do it and that's not feasible.
 

canuck78

VIP Member
Jun 18, 2017
27,962
6,049
I was reading a thread about submitting material to prove the relationship is genuine and some of the more credible things include joint bank statements, bills, proof of common address etc. I and my partner don't have such proof as we are both self-sufficient students in different countries (the US and Canada) and never lived together long enough to have those things. The longest we've lived together is 4 months but it was by a family so the evidence is scarce, so again no luck.

We do have a lot of itineraries proving we have been visiting each other (more than 20-30 I'd say), traveled bunch of places around the world together, an infinite amount of pictures (both alone and with all of our families), lots of chats and such, but I've read these are lower priority evidence.

My common sense tells me that an average person reviewing this application will have no doubt the relationship is genuine, but I don't know what would an immigration officer reviewing it expect. Does anyone have a similar experience (haven't lived together for too long and lacking such evidence) and can share their experience? Is a lack of such evidence a deal-breaker and can cause issues with the application?
P.S. I'm trying to avoid an interview because I would have to travel to my home country to do it and that's not feasible.
If you have travelled together you have spent time living together. Include proof of your travels together especially if it was just the 2 of you.
 

k.h.p.

VIP Member
Mar 1, 2019
7,840
1,707
Canada
I was reading a thread about submitting material to prove the relationship is genuine and some of the more credible things include joint bank statements, bills, proof of common address etc. I and my partner don't have such proof as we are both self-sufficient students in different countries (the US and Canada) and never lived together long enough to have those things. The longest we've lived together is 4 months but it was by a family so the evidence is scarce, so again no luck.

We do have a lot of itineraries proving we have been visiting each other (more than 20-30 I'd say), traveled bunch of places around the world together, an infinite amount of pictures (both alone and with all of our families), lots of chats and such, but I've read these are lower priority evidence.

My common sense tells me that an average person reviewing this application will have no doubt the relationship is genuine, but I don't know what would an immigration officer reviewing it expect. Does anyone have a similar experience (haven't lived together for too long and lacking such evidence) and can share their experience? Is a lack of such evidence a deal-breaker and can cause issues with the application?
P.S. I'm trying to avoid an interview because I would have to travel to my home country to do it and that's not feasible.
Those things will all help.

I am assuming you're married?

The interview is typically in the country in which you are resident, not just your home country.
 

heyhowareyou

Member
Jul 12, 2020
12
1
Those things will all help.

I am assuming you're married?

The interview is typically in the country in which you are resident, not just your home country.
Yes, we are married.

I am resident only in my home country ( student visa in the US), so I believe I can only go there for an interview, as I'll be doing outland.
 

k.h.p.

VIP Member
Mar 1, 2019
7,840
1,707
Canada
Yes, we are married.

I am resident only in my home country ( student visa in the US), so I believe I can only go there for an interview, as I'll be doing outland.
Country of residence means where you are living when you apply, not any legal status on your passport or anything. If you're living in the US when you apply, you are resident in the United States.
 

heyhowareyou

Member
Jul 12, 2020
12
1
Country of residence means where you are living when you apply, not any legal status on your passport or anything. If you're living in the US when you apply, you are resident in the United States.
I'll be in Canada for a couple of months when I'm applying, but I feel I shouldn't put that as a residence, cause it's temporary and I'm doing outland.
Or should I?
 

k.h.p.

VIP Member
Mar 1, 2019
7,840
1,707
Canada
I'll be in Canada for a couple of months when I'm applying, but I feel I shouldn't put that as a residence, cause it's temporary and I'm doing outland.
Or should I?
Are you moving to Canada or just visiting? Will you be going back to the US afterwards?

If you put Canada as your country of residence, you may well be asked to go to your home country for an interview.
 

heyhowareyou

Member
Jul 12, 2020
12
1
Are you moving to Canada or just visiting? Will you be going back to the US afterwards?

If you put Canada as your country of residence, you may well be asked to go to your home country for an interview.
I'm just visiting for a couple of months.
I will go back to US afterwards to finish school, though I still don't have an address (I plan to rent). I guess I should stick with my home country address then
 

k.h.p.

VIP Member
Mar 1, 2019
7,840
1,707
Canada
Then any interview will be in your home country unless you update IRCC with your residence address, as you will be required to do.

If you require an interview.