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SEPTEMBER 2019 *Outland* Spousal Sponsorship

Ellinismos

Full Member
Feb 12, 2019
24
7
Hello Everyone.

My grandmother in Canada is unfortunately very ill and might be dying. I’m sponsoring my wife who is from a non visa waiver country and, at the moment, we’re both living in Europe. We’re not sure if my grandmother will make it through to see my wife and I arrive in Canada by the time my wife gets PR (hopefully September of this year according to the official estimates).

When my grandmother was ill last August - so just before we applied in September - our lawyer said we might look into a TRV. We gathered the documents, but then my lawyer and I both decided that lodging a TRV app might cause questions etc. and might disrupt the process of the PR application we were just about to launch. We both thought it wise to not act since grandma appeared to be improving.

The same reasoning was given about applying for a TRV after lodging PR - it might cause a disruption and she will probably be denied.

However, my grandmother, according to my mother, is slowly but surely dying, and probably has a few months to live. In light of this, my mother asked:

1. Could our lawyer ask CIC to speed up the process due to these circumstances ?
2. If we apply for a TRV due to grandma dying, what are the chances my wife will get it (not she was denied one TRV in 2016)
3. In the event of grandmother death, what are the chances my wife will be issued a TRV for the funeral?
 

Belarusian

Hero Member
Sep 3, 2019
899
444
Hello Everyone.

My grandmother in Canada is unfortunately very ill and might be dying. I’m sponsoring my wife who is from a non visa waiver country and, at the moment, we’re both living in Europe. We’re not sure if my grandmother will make it through to see my wife and I arrive in Canada by the time my wife gets PR (hopefully September of this year according to the official estimates).

When my grandmother was ill last August - so just before we applied in September - our lawyer said we might look into a TRV. We gathered the documents, but then my lawyer and I both decided that lodging a TRV app might cause questions etc. and might disrupt the process of the PR application we were just about to launch. We both thought it wise to not act since grandma appeared to be improving.

The same reasoning was given about applying for a TRV after lodging PR - it might cause a disruption and she will probably be denied.

However, my grandmother, according to my mother, is slowly but surely dying, and probably has a few months to live. In light of this, my mother asked:

1. Could our lawyer ask CIC to speed up the process due to these circumstances ?
2. If we apply for a TRV due to grandma dying, what are the chances my wife will get it (not she was denied one TRV in 2016)
3. In the event of grandmother death, what are the chances my wife will be issued a TRV for the funeral?
1. no
2.50%/50%
3.50%/50%
 

armoured

VIP Member
Feb 1, 2015
6,775
3,618
1. no
2.50%/50%
3.50%/50%
Is this 50% statistical estimate meaning "either you get it or you don't?" :)

Anyway I do agree, it's still worth applying to try. No-one can really know what the chances of success are.

@Ellinismos , you say you are living in Europe - note that your spouse may have a better chance if you both are living in a visa waiver country and her status there is 'official' (resident or some long-term status of some kind). As well as the usual things like whether you and/or her are employed there, and basically likely to return there. You can write a letter with your application and see if that helps; having a good reason to visit and for that reason to be time-limited does help, although no-one can say whether it will be sufficient to convince the examining officer.
 
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newhere

Member
Dec 21, 2017
10
1
Singapore
Category........
FSW
NOC Code......
2173
Hello Guys,

I am yet to submit my application. I know there is no income eligibility on spousal sponsorship. As any sponsor who is unemployed submitted application?
Is showing considerable savings and mentioning through a letter that sponsor is not relying on any provincial benefits and eligible to support spouse through their personal savings enough for the sponsor approval?
 

xMrsBee

Star Member
Aug 19, 2019
104
63
Visa Office......
New York
App. Filed.......
22-08-2019
AOR Received.
21-09-2019
File Transfer...
30-10-2019
Med's Request
26-09-2019
Med's Done....
02-10-2019
Interview........
06/10/2020
Submitted my biometrics for the third time (two fingerprint rejections..) a couple of days ago - just got an email that I've been transferred to the consulate in New York. Anyone know if this means anything in particular?

The letter does not give any reason, only that my file will be transferred to the New York visa office.
Welcome to the club. My husband is the PA from America and we were transferred to Mississauga in Sept and then in Oct they transferred us to NY. We got AOR2 on Nov 18 and haven’t heard anything since. I talk with one other girl here who’s file has gone to NYVO as well. It’s so nice to see someone else.
 

jas1525

Full Member
Oct 4, 2012
36
5
My husband files was moved to cpc missausaga nov. 13- since then no updates. ecas stucked on medical received. Anyone on the same scenario? Im worried.
 

Obioha

Star Member
Nov 18, 2019
141
35
Is this 50% statistical estimate meaning "either you get it or you don't?" :)

Anyway I do agree, it's still worth applying to try. No-one can really know what the chances of success are.

@Ellinismos , you say you are living in Europe - note that your spouse may have a better chance if you both are living in a visa waiver country and her status there is 'official' (resident or some long-term status of some kind). As well as the usual things like whether you and/or her are employed there, and basically likely to return there. You can write a letter with your application and see if that helps; having a good reason to visit and for that reason to be time-limited does help, although no-one can say whether it will be sufficient to convince the examining officer.
Highly unlikely since u have already submitted ur PR application. Might be wrong though
 

armoured

VIP Member
Feb 1, 2015
6,775
3,618
Highly unlikely since u have already submitted ur PR application. Might be wrong though
I might also be wrong, but I am quite confident in saying that the chances of getting approved are higher for someone with long-term e.g. residency status in a visa waiver country (esp EU/Schengen country).

Details matter and I don't know all the details. But all things being equal, the chances are higher as the risk of overstaying or not being able to return somewhere 'desirable' are lower. I could come up with multiple hypothetical cases that would be pretty easy decisions for an immigration officer.

Again, not saying this is 100%. Someone with refugee or short-term visitor status or no status at all in Germany (for example) who doestn' speak the language and has no ties is a different case than the spouse of a bank executive in France (who might have dual citizenship?). As far as I'm aware, most EU/Schengen countries give some form of residency status to spouses of people with residency status in the EU, but I'm sure there are lots of details I don't know about.

But overall, I don't see much downside to applying for a TRV. Just my opinion though, and based on limited details.
 
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Ellinismos

Full Member
Feb 12, 2019
24
7
I might also be wrong, but I am quite confident in saying that the chances of getting approved are higher for someone with long-term e.g. residency status in a visa waiver country (esp EU/Schengen country).

Details matter and I don't know all the details. But all things being equal, the chances are higher as the risk of overstaying or not being able to return somewhere 'desirable' are lower. I could come up with multiple hypothetical cases that would be pretty easy decisions for an immigration officer.

Again, not saying this is 100%. Someone with refugee or short-term visitor status or no status at all in Germany (for example) who doestn' speak the language and has no ties is a different case than the spouse of a bank executive in France (who might have dual citizenship?). As far as I'm aware, most EU/Schengen countries give some form of residency status to spouses of people with residency status in the EU, but I'm sure there are lots of details I don't know about.

But overall, I don't see much downside to applying for a TRV. Just my opinion though, and based on limited details.

All very true. While I’m a duel EU - Canadian citizen, and employed in the EU my wife isn’t either a citizen, or employed, so while she has EU residency (ironically in two EU countries at once) her financial situation depends on me. And this was used to deny her a TRV some years ago.
 

armoured

VIP Member
Feb 1, 2015
6,775
3,618
All very true. While I’m a duel EU - Canadian citizen, and employed in the EU my wife isn’t either a citizen, or employed, so while she has EU residency (ironically in two EU countries at once) her financial situation depends on me. And this was used to deny her a TRV some years ago.
You say 'some years ago' and already that gives info that may mean they will look at your file differently, i.e. you are in a relationship for several years now. (Married all that time or no?)

Anyway, you'll note I was careful to put this in terms of probability: the chances are higher than in some other circumstances. Getting refused once before is not destiny, nor is having a pending PR application.

I don't mean to get anyone's hopes up unrealistically, mind.

My one bit of additional advice is apply, include some info (short written description or letter), even though a lot is done electronically and automatically, your chances of having a letter read are exactly zero if you don't submit one.

If you have a contact at embassy or MPs office or employer or family or whatever else, sometimes that also helps. Not always, but sometimes.