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Ray of hope - FSW - 1

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Rish92

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Jan 22, 2021
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Quota is necessary for diversity like the US does.
India has consistently been the top source of immigrants for Australia.
Also, country caps will make it easier for people of small countries but big countries will struggle. Isn’t US trying to revamp that?
 
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seadrag0n

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Another one in this boat. I haven't qualified for the OINP French speaker draw as my score's too high (480, dropping to 470 in July). Hoping for a nomination through this this year or next.

I'm also looking at study options - I have French nationality, we benefit from zero student fees if we apply to go to Quebec (plus my wife would be able allowed a temporary work permit)

Finally I'm in the process of becoming a roofer-carpenter. If FSTP picks up again, I should qualify through this in 2-3 years.

Basically everyone should be looking at ALL options at the moment and realise that NOTHING is guaranteed.. ://
Try to lower your score to below 467 by redoing IELTS or something else, others are doing it and getting the invitation from OINP.
 

Rish92

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Australia and NZ had this type of immigration for a long long time.
If that is the case, then be it..
But do you IRCC will be super generous with CEC and so stingy with FSW?
Australia and NZ are stingy with both types...even a double masters who has been educated in Australia finds its impossible to migrate
Australian govt is just using curtailed migration to win votes.

It has become nearly impossible to get PR after studying there.

Doesn’t look like either of the parties will ever bring the intake to pre-2017 levels when every other person used to get invited.

People who got in before 2017 are the lucky ones. People who, for whatever reasons, delayed their plans have shot themselves in the foot.
 

Rish92

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But it would be counter productive for the education industry....i reckon.

India supplies cash cows to these university...student population from other countries have dried up....Ten or twelve years ago,China was number 1..Now India is number 1 with a wide margin..

This is the only argument i got against this scenario
Surprisingly, even after Australia banned entry for all international students, their uni enrolments haven’t dropped by big margin. People are still spending thousands of dollars applying for studies in dreams of that sweet PR, no matter how slim the chances!
 

dankboi

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Influential voices are calling for a boost in migration. But in a post-pandemic economy, will the stage be set for newcomers to flourish?
by Andrew Griffith May 20, 2021

Former prime minister Brian Mulroney recently called for a government white paper on immigration to support the Century Initiative and Business Council of Canada’s advocacy in favour of a Canada of 100 million people by 2100. Immigration is seen as the most likely way to address Canada’s aging population and ensure there are a sufficient number of working adults to pay for increased health care and other costs of seniors, with calls for more than 80 per cent of Canada’s population growth to be due to immigration.

In many ways, this has parallels with the Royal Commission on the Economic Union and Development Prospects for Canada initiated under a Liberal government in the early 1980s that paved the way for the Canada-U.S. free trade agreement under the Conservative Mulroney government.

While a comprehensive and independent look at our immigration policies and programs is merited, any such review should take a critical look at Canada’s current and future needs, what fundamental questions need to be asked and the realities of what an increase would entail across Canadian society.

In the short term, we need to consider what the experience of past economic downturns tells us about immigrant economic outcomes. Statistics Canada’s Feng Hou gave a presentation in January of this year regarding the labour market outcomes during the COVID-19 lockdown and recovery. That presentation pointed out that following the 1990-91 recession, many recent immigrants were unemployed and under-employed, leading to criticism that Canada was overselling immigration. In contrast, immigrants arriving around the time of the 2008-9 recession were largely unscathed. It is too early to tell whether immigrant outcomes will resemble the deep and prolonged impact of 1990-91 or the minimal impact of 2008-9.

However, given what we know about which sectors (hospitality, travel, retail) and which groups (women, immigrants and visible minorities) have been most affected during COVID-19, how confident should we be that these sectors and groups will bounce back quickly? Will increased immigration exacerbate the difficulties these sectors and groups face? How likely is increased immigration to result in improved working conditions and equality for those we now recognize as “essential workers?”

In the longer term, it is striking the relative lack of attention regarding what sectors and workers are more likely to be vulnerable to automation, artificial intelligence (AI) and remote work, particularly in the context of setting a target some 80 years from now. Will professionals such as accountants, lawyers and other white-collar occupations become increasingly replaced in whole or in part? Will increased automation and AI result in “creative destruction” and new industry and job creation, or a further hollowing out of manufacturing? Will improved remote working technology lead to more offshoring and reduce the interest of moving and immigrating?

Only 8.7 per cent of recent immigrants settle outside our major urban areas. How realistic is the call for more immigrants to settle outside our major cities and urban areas? While the Provincial Nominee Program has had some success as have the various pilots (e.g., Atlantic, Northern and Remote), most new immigrants tend to settle in the larger provinces and urban centres. Government efforts to encourage immigration to francophone communities in English Canada continue to fall short of targets.

There are a number of other medium- and longer-term issues that will need to be addressed to successfully manage such growth.

To start, will governments invest in the public and private infrastructure needed to accommodate such growth, ranging from roads, transit, housing, health care, utilities and parks? Doug Saunders, in Maximum Canada, makes the convincing case that large-scale immigration requires these investments, along with other measures such as zoning to increase population density. However, experience to date suggests that Canadian governments have not done so, hampering growth and quality of life.

Canada already has difficulties meeting its climate change commitments. How likely is it that Canada will be able to do so with a significant increase in population creating further urban sprawl? Even if Canada manages to reduce emissions on a per-capita basis, a larger population will mean an overall increase in carbon emissions.

Will the general consensus among provincial governments in favour of more immigration increasingly confront the reality of Quebec’s reduced percentage of the Canadian population and the consequent increasing imbalance between population and representation in our various political and judicial institutions? How will Indigenous peoples, the fastest-growing group in Canada, perceive increased immigration, compared to addressing their socioeconomic and political issues?

The coalition that the Century Initiative is building in favour of increased immigration across the business community, non-governmental organizations, academics and others is impressive. The business community interest is clear: more immigrants mean more customers. But for any review or commission to be meaningful, it needs to engage with a broader group than those who already favour increased immigration and focus on per capita, rather than overall, growth.

Moreover, such a review has to question the fundamental premise that more immigration will “substantially alter Canada’s age structure and impending increase in the dependency ratio” when the available evidence suggests it will not.

A white paper that largely replicates the group think of the Century Initiative and related players rather than a much-needed more thoughtful and balanced discussion would be a disservice to Canadians.
 
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Uncle Yayo

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Influential voices are calling for a boost in migration. But in a post-pandemic economy, will the stage be set for newcomers to flourish?
by Andrew Griffith May 20, 2021

Former prime minister Brian Mulroney recently called for a government white paper on immigration to support the Century Initiative and Business Council of Canada’s advocacy in favour of a Canada of 100 million people by 2100. Immigration is seen as the most likely way to address Canada’s aging population and ensure there are a sufficient number of working adults to pay for increased health care and other costs of seniors, with calls for more than 80 per cent of Canada’s population growth to be due to immigration.

In many ways, this has parallels with the Royal Commission on the Economic Union and Development Prospects for Canada initiated under a Liberal government in the early 1980s that paved the way for the Canada-U.S. free trade agreement under the Conservative Mulroney government.

While a comprehensive and independent look at our immigration policies and programs is merited, any such review should take a critical look at Canada’s current and future needs, what fundamental questions need to be asked and the realities of what an increase would entail across Canadian society.

In the short term, we need to consider what the experience of past economic downturns tells us about immigrant economic outcomes. Statistics Canada’s Feng Hou gave a presentation in January of this year regarding the labour market outcomes during the COVID-19 lockdown and recovery. That presentation pointed out that following the 1990-91 recession, many recent immigrants were unemployed and under-employed, leading to criticism that Canada was overselling immigration. In contrast, immigrants arriving around the time of the 2008-9 recession were largely unscathed. It is too early to tell whether immigrant outcomes will resemble the deep and prolonged impact of 1990-91 or the minimal impact of 2008-9.

However, given what we know about which sectors (hospitality, travel, retail) and which groups (women, immigrants and visible minorities) have been most affected during COVID-19, how confident should we be that these sectors and groups will bounce back quickly? Will increased immigration exacerbate the difficulties these sectors and groups face? How likely is increased immigration to result in improved working conditions and equality for those we now recognize as “essential workers?”

In the longer term, it is striking the relative lack of attention regarding what sectors and workers are more likely to be vulnerable to automation, artificial intelligence (AI) and remote work, particularly in the context of setting a target some 80 years from now. Will professionals such as accountants, lawyers and other white-collar occupations become increasingly replaced in whole or in part? Will increased automation and AI result in “creative destruction” and new industry and job creation, or a further hollowing out of manufacturing? Will improved remote working technology lead to more offshoring and reduce the interest of moving and immigrating?

Only 8.7 per cent of recent immigrants settle outside our major urban areas. How realistic is the call for more immigrants to settle outside our major cities and urban areas? While the Provincial Nominee Program has had some success as have the various pilots (e.g., Atlantic, Northern and Remote), most new immigrants tend to settle in the larger provinces and urban centres. Government efforts to encourage immigration to francophone communities in English Canada continue to fall short of targets.

There are a number of other medium- and longer-term issues that will need to be addressed to successfully manage such growth.

To start, will governments invest in the public and private infrastructure needed to accommodate such growth, ranging from roads, transit, housing, health care, utilities and parks? Doug Saunders, in Maximum Canada, makes the convincing case that large-scale immigration requires these investments, along with other measures such as zoning to increase population density. However, experience to date suggests that Canadian governments have not done so, hampering growth and quality of life.

Canada already has difficulties meeting its climate change commitments. How likely is it that Canada will be able to do so with a significant increase in population creating further urban sprawl? Even if Canada manages to reduce emissions on a per-capita basis, a larger population will mean an overall increase in carbon emissions.

Will the general consensus among provincial governments in favour of more immigration increasingly confront the reality of Quebec’s reduced percentage of the Canadian population and the consequent increasing imbalance between population and representation in our various political and judicial institutions? How will Indigenous peoples, the fastest-growing group in Canada, perceive increased immigration, compared to addressing their socioeconomic and political issues?

The coalition that the Century Initiative is building in favour of increased immigration across the business community, non-governmental organizations, academics and others is impressive. The business community interest is clear: more immigrants mean more customers. But for any review or commission to be meaningful, it needs to engage with a broader group than those who already favour increased immigration and focus on per capita, rather than overall, growth.

Moreover, such a review has to question the fundamental premise that more immigration will “substantially alter Canada’s age structure and impending increase in the dependency ratio” when the available evidence suggests it will not.

A white paper that largely replicates the group think of the Century Initiative and related players rather than a much-needed more thoughtful and balanced discussion would be a disservice to Canadians.
I was a bit troubled when I saw Mendincino’s face... I was worried he was the one saying all of this.. but later on I realised it wasn’t him.. issok... everybody has an opinion on immigration, it’s only IRCC’s and the PM’s that counts
 

dankboi

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I was a bit troubled when I saw Mendincino’s face... I was worried he was the one saying all of this.. but later on I realised it wasn’t him.. issok... everybody has an opinion on immigration, it’s only IRCC’s and the PM’s that counts
Included the image so it looks like reading a newspaper. that's how it was in original article.

 
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sahilarora2003

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Canadian Immigration: A Preview of the Rest of 2021

Two major issues will shape the trajectory of Canadian immigration for the remainder of this year.

They are Canada’s ability to contain and ultimately defeat the coronavirus pandemicand secondly, whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau decides to call an election by the fall. The following is a preview of what we can expect.

COVID-19 in Canada
Canadian immigration policy has been disrupted by COVID-19 since March 2020. Every single policy decision that is being made is influenced by the immigration department’s ability to navigate COVID-related disruptions. Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has introduced a dizzying number of policy changes and new programs as it aims to achieve the country’s immigration goals to the best of its ability amid the pandemic.

The past few months saw a worrisome increase in COVID-19 cases across Canada. The third wave of the virus has resulted in new lockdowns in Canada’s two largest provinces, Ontario and Quebec, and the fourth largest province, Alberta.

Fortunately, things have improved in recent weeks. New COVID-19 cases are now trending downward nationally after Canada hit over 10,000 daily cases during some parts of April. This is a function of stricter public health measures and Canada’s vaccination campaign beginning to hit stride.

Canada has now received over 20 million vaccine doses.

Over 40 per cent of the eligible Canadian population has received at least one shot which means Canada ranks among the top five OECD countries in this metric alongside Israel, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Chile.

Canada expects to receive over 20 million more doses by the end of June, and numerous federal and provincial political leaders have stated they hope the country will be able to return to some form of normalcy this summer.

The ability for Canada to return to more normalcy would significantly change the Canadian government’s immigration calculus. Namely, the public health and safety arms of the federal government and IRCC could then give stronger consideration to welcoming more foreign nationals from overseas.

Find Out if You’re Eligible for Canadian Immigration

Will Trudeau Call a Federal Election?
Press reports are indicating that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is considering calling a federal election in the second half of 2021. The rumors suggest this will be tied to the point above. That is, if the vaccine campaign is executed successfully and Canada defeats the pandemic, Trudeau may end up with stronger public support which will propel him to a third mandate. Trudeau won a majority government in 2015 but only obtained a minority in 2019 as his public support fell. However polls indicate he remains the most popular leader among Canada’s main federal political parties and is in position to get a majority.

The last two elections were called late in the summer and were held in October. Cabinets were then announced in November or December and the new government really began to govern in January. Election campaigns in Canada are rarely held leading up to Christmas due to the importance of the winter holidays in the country. Hence, we should gain a sense of whether Trudeau will call an election by September at the latest.

The call of an election would have some impact on Canadian immigration. Big picture items such as the country’s immigration levels plan, Express Entry, the Provincial Nominee Program (PNP), and other broad policy items would remain unaffected. However, the implementation of new policies and programs, as well as the government’s responsiveness to emerging issues would be limited until the election results have been determined.

What next?
Canada’s ability to alleviate travel restrictions and allow more Confirmation of Permanent Residence (COPR) holderswill depend on the success of its vaccine campaign in the coming months. IRCC has said little on COPRs — these are individuals overseas who have received permanent residence approval, but who are unable to enter Canada for now unless they fall under an exemption — other than it will not require them to restart their application process and that it looks forward to welcoming them into Canada when the pandemic situation improves.

The first major sign of Canada’s willingness to lift restrictions will be what it and the U.S. choose to do with respect to their own border restrictions. The U.S. is ahead of Canada in its reopening but if Canada is able to soon catch up, it is possible more travel between the two countries will be allowed by the summer according to recent reporting.Should this happen, Canada would then turn its sights to lifting restrictions for travellers coming from other countries.

The COVID-19 situation in Canada will also impact which candidates are considered for Express Entry draws. At the start of the pandemic, Canada only considered Canadian Experience Class (CEC) and Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) candidates. It then considered all candidates in the second half of 2020 which included Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) and Federal Skilled Trades Program (FSTP) candidates.

Since the start of this year, it has only considered CEC and PNP candidates again. IRCC’s rationale is it wants to prioritize transitioning those in Canada to permanent residence since they are less affected by COVID-related interruptions. However, IRCC will be able to consider FSWP and FSTP candidates once the virus is contained, and given that the containment of the virus is appearing increasingly likely, we should expect a return to all-program Express Entry draws sometime in the second half of 2021.

IRCC’s aforementioned rationale is also why it has introduced a temporary public policy with six new immigration programs for essential workers and international graduates. The anglophone International Graduate stream hit its cap of 40,000 applications in a little over one day. The uptake for the essential worker and francophone streams has been unsurprisingly lower, however we can expect an uptick in those streams in the months to come.

In the meantime, Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino has openly said IRCC is willing to consider lifting the caps for these streams, which would benefit anglophone international graduates the most. The minister said this will depend on a number of factors, including total volume of applications and the quality of the applications. Undoubtedly, this decision will also be related to Canada’s ability to eventually lift travel restrictions on COPRs. The longer the restrictions are in place, the more likely IRCC will consider increasing the caps for these six new programs.

Other things to look out for are the Municipal Nominee Program (MNP), the waiving of fees for Canadian citizenship applications, the Parents and Grandparents Program (PGP) 2021, and the Immigration Levels Plan 2022-2024.

Mendicino’s mandate letter calls for the launch of the MNP and making citizenship applications free, but these initiatives have been delayed by the pandemic. IRCC is also due to announce details on the PGP 2021 opening and it has indicated the program will have the same format as the PGP 2020 (an expression of interest window, followed by a lottery). Finally, the next levels plan announcement should be fairly standard. Canada will very likely stick to the plan to welcome over 400,000 new immigrants per year.
 

dankboi

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Since the start of this year, it has only considered CEC and PNP candidates again. IRCC’s rationale is it wants to prioritize transitioning those in Canada to permanent residence since they are less affected by COVID-related interruptions. However, IRCC will be able to consider FSWP and FSTP candidates once the virus is contained, and given that the containment of the virus is appearing increasingly likely, we should expect a return to all-program Express Entry draws sometime in the second half of 2021.

 

Talal205

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Feb 3, 2021
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Hey guys, I have a question related to EE profile.
If I have two NOCs that are skill level A, and after submitting my profile I switched my main NOC from one to the other, will that be a problem? will they ask me why and possibly affect my credibility?
My question is because SINP excludes NOC 1111 but accepts 1311, and I can be considered either. Not to mention that accounting is a regulated profession.
 

dankboi

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If they would conduct new FSW draws later in the year, then it also indicates they would be processing existing FSW applications. Because that's what concerns me. Pertaining to the rest of the matter, I can give a F or two.
me too ...
I searched a lot to find one to give but none could i find. also i dun think anyone here will find one to give. you should probably keep them rather wasting it.

 
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dankboi

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Hey guys, I have a question related to EE profile.
If I have two NOCs that are skill level A, and after submitting my profile I switched my main NOC from one to the other, will that be a problem? will they ask me why and possibly affect my credibility?
My question is because SINP excludes NOC 1111 but accepts 1311, and I can be considered either. Not to mention that accounting is a regulated profession.
lets wait if someone can respond to it
 
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