+1(514) 937-9445 or Toll-free (Canada & US) +1 (888) 947-9445

Proof of same address - translation necessary?

Mjg0503

Star Member
Mar 20, 2019
145
64
Hello,

My wife and I live together and we are trying to prove that. I have copies of our government issued IDs where we reside (South Korea) and two pieces of mail (tax bills) addressed to us at the same address. Obviously the addresses are written in Korean. Is this something that I need to have translated? It seems that the officer could just compare the addresses visually and see that they are the same. We are married and provide our marriage certificate as well (with notarized translation), so this is not necessary to prove a common-law relationship. Thanks for any insights.
 
 

thevisawhisperer

Champion Member
Jun 10, 2020
2,001
332
West Coast
Any document that you want an officer to consider must be translated into English or French.
Proof of genuineness of relationship is required for married couples as well as common law so documenting cohabitation is not necessary only for common law couples.
 

Mjg0503

Star Member
Mar 20, 2019
145
64
Any document that you want an officer to consider must be translated into English or French.
Proof of genuineness of relationship is required for married couples as well as common law so documenting cohabitation is not necessary only for common law couples.
Korean addresses aren't even really translatable. The best that can really be done is a transliteration into Roman characters. The rest of the ID document is already in English, and the piece of mail is just a tax bill that has a lot of irrelevant information on it. Would I really need to have both of these documents fully translated, or would just the part with the addresses suffice?
 

thevisawhisperer

Champion Member
Jun 10, 2020
2,001
332
West Coast
I lived in Japan for a long time and we were able to send mail to and receive mail from the English speaking world by transliterating the addresses in the Latin alphabet. So no, I didn't translate my address as Deer Plateau, but rather shikanodai.
As for having the full document translated, it would be useful for an officer to see what the document is in order to decide how much credibility or weight to give it.