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Permanent Resident Renewal Timeline 2018

Pari123

Hero Member
Apr 11, 2012
998
23
Category........
Visa Office......
Buffalo/Ottawa
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
26 Feb, 2012
Doc's Request.
18 Mar, 2013
Nomination.....
25 Jan,2012
AOR Received.
26 April, 2012
IELTS Request
No
Med's Request
26 April, 2012
Med's Done....
3 May 2012. In Process: May 21,2013
Passport Req..
July 23,2013
VISA ISSUED...
July 31,2013
LANDED..........
Aug 17, 2013
Congrats. I got AOR today in the morning. In the ECas only “application received on 27 September “ is written.
Congrats hargobinder, I am happy for you since we were same day. They are processing on urgent basis
 

Pari123

Hero Member
Apr 11, 2012
998
23
Category........
Visa Office......
Buffalo/Ottawa
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
26 Feb, 2012
Doc's Request.
18 Mar, 2013
Nomination.....
25 Jan,2012
AOR Received.
26 April, 2012
IELTS Request
No
Med's Request
26 April, 2012
Med's Done....
3 May 2012. In Process: May 21,2013
Passport Req..
July 23,2013
VISA ISSUED...
July 31,2013
LANDED..........
Aug 17, 2013
An update on my side as well friends. My Ecas says Complete and when I click it, this is what it shows:
Permanent Resident Card
  1. We received your application for a permanent resident card on June 13, 2018.
  2. We sent you correspondence acknowledging receipt of your application(s) on September 23, 2018.
  3. We started processing your application on September 23, 2018.
  4. Your Permanent Resident card was sent by mail on September 29, 2018.
 

robw

Hero Member
Mar 10, 2014
286
91
15 days. Next level anxiety begins with Canada Post possible strike. Hopefully IRCC sends cards by courier to CIC for pick ups for assured and timely delivery.
If it's anything like the 2014 strike, I'm afraid that will not be the case. I waited 5 months to get my OWP back then.
 

jagga

Hero Member
Feb 25, 2011
488
13
Canada
Category........
FAM
Visa Office......
New delhi
App. Filed.......
10 June 2014
Med's Request
2 feb 2016- remedical
Med's Done....
5 feb 2016-remedical
Interview........
1 feb 2016 (Application approved)
Passport Req..
8 MAY 2017
VISA ISSUED...
17 MAY 2017
LANDED..........
20 MAY 2017
  1. We received your application for a permanent resident card on June 6, 2018.
  2. We sent you correspondence acknowledging receipt of your application(s) on September 20, 2018.
  3. We started processing your application on September 20, 2018.
  4. Your Permanent Resident card was sent by mail on September 29, 2018.
I applied with thousands of entries to usa as i work as a longhaul truck driver. I was bit worried when i applied as didn't mention any enry and just wrote (numerous entries to usa, please get information from cbsa).
Thanks.
 
Last edited:

vnps1903

Star Member
Sep 3, 2018
94
3
  1. We received your application for a permanent resident card on June 6, 2018.
  2. We sent you correspondence acknowledging receipt of your application(s) on September 20, 2018.
  3. We started processing your application on September 20, 2018.
  4. Your Permanent Resident card was sent by mail on September 29, 2018.
I applied with thousands of entries to usa as i work as a longhaul truck driver. I was bit worried when i applied as didn't mention any enry and just wrote (numerous entries to usa, please get information from cbsa). So any one applying with countless entries to usa please do not worry.
Thanks.
 

vnps1903

Star Member
Sep 3, 2018
94
3
Congrats! Did u Chk on e CAS or received email.I think they are expediting and mailing on Saturdays also (29 sept Saturday) IRCC is equally concerned and glad corrective steps are being taken to ease the anxiety. They mailed to u ( nor CIC office) it seems. When did u Chk eCAS? Today or yday?
 

jagga

Hero Member
Feb 25, 2011
488
13
Canada
Category........
FAM
Visa Office......
New delhi
App. Filed.......
10 June 2014
Med's Request
2 feb 2016- remedical
Med's Done....
5 feb 2016-remedical
Interview........
1 feb 2016 (Application approved)
Passport Req..
8 MAY 2017
VISA ISSUED...
17 MAY 2017
LANDED..........
20 MAY 2017
Congrats! Did u Chk on e CAS or received email.I think they are expediting and mailing on Saturdays also (29 sept Saturday) IRCC is equally concerned and glad corrective steps are being taken to ease the anxiety. They mailed to u ( nor CIC office) it seems. When did u Chk eCAS? Today or yday?
Thanks bro..just checked ecas, no email. Hopefully i ll get it soon in my mailbox.
 

Radium

Star Member
Apr 12, 2013
144
19
Category........
Visa Office......
CPC-M
NOC Code......
INLAND
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
September 18, 2014
AOR Received.
May 28. 2015
Med's Done....
August 18, 2014
I’m surprised CIC is working on weekends.

My PRC application status says Complete with an update:

4. Your Permanent Resident card was sent by mail on September 28, 2018.
 

dpenabill

VIP Member
Apr 2, 2010
4,978
2,128
Hyperbole Warning: WHEN SOMEONE STATES THAT OTHERS CAN RELY ON HOW THINGS WENT FOR HER, THAT IS AN EXAGGERATION OVER THE LINE.

A to-be-clear post.

Not all hyperbole or exaggeration means an anecdotal report lacks credibility. Sure, obviously it is totally unlikely anyone entered the U.S. "thousands" of times since there are only 1825 days in the relevant five years (at the high end, hundreds of times is the more likely scenario, even for daily commuters recognizing, however, some might actually reach a thousand trips), and of course the number of trips can always be counted, the number is never "countless."

Many exaggerations can be put in context and the report understood well enough despite the hyperbole.

The more important caveat, however, is that it is rarely possible to extrapolate what is likely to happen to another PR based on what has happened for one PR, let alone declare what will happen. Even when the proposition is not mired in exaggerations.

The scenarios in which PRs are frequent travelers to the U.S. vary widely. In many cases frequent trips into the U.S. actually tends to be a strong positive factor, since each of those trips are proof-positive of actual presence in Canada that day, and also strongly imply presence in Canada the previous day if not more than that. In conjunction with employment for a Canadian employer, this tends to help make a rather strong case.

But there are other factors which can push the needle in the other direction. DEPENDS.

In any event, even if ten or a hundred, let alone just one person, report no problem despite defying the instructions to detail dates of all trips outside Canada, IT WOULD BE FOOLISH TO FOLLOW SUCH AN EXAMPLE.

I am not judging the credibility of any particular anecdotal report here. No need to do that. There is little doubt, no real debate, when applying for a new PR card the burden of proof in showing RO compliance is on the PR, and the instructions are clear enough. It is always possible to keep track of each and every trip. PRs will be wise to do precisely that. And then completely and accurately report their trips.

There are many ways to explain possible exceptions, assuming they are truthful. Again, no need to go there. PRs should keep careful record of all trips outside Canada, even if engaged in a daily commute to the U.S., and accurately report all trips when applying for a new PR card and especially when applying for citizenship.

When in doubt, follow the instructions; otherwise, yep, follow the instructions.

Suggestions that it is OK to do otherwise should be largely if not totally disregarded.
 

CalgaryIPL

Full Member
Apr 17, 2017
26
5
Hyperbole Warning: WHEN SOMEONE STATES THAT OTHERS CAN RELY ON HOW THINGS WENT FOR HER, THAT IS AN EXAGGERATION OVER THE LINE.

A to-be-clear post.

Not all hyperbole or exaggeration means an anecdotal report lacks credibility. Sure, obviously it is totally unlikely anyone entered the U.S. "thousands" of times since there are only 1825 days in the relevant five years (at the high end, hundreds of times is the more likely scenario, even for daily commuters recognizing, however, some might actually reach a thousand trips), and of course the number of trips can always be counted, the number is never "countless."

Many exaggerations can be put in context and the report understood well enough despite the hyperbole.

The more important caveat, however, is that it is rarely possible to extrapolate what is likely to happen to another PR based on what has happened for one PR, let alone declare what will happen. Even when the proposition is not mired in exaggerations.

The scenarios in which PRs are frequent travelers to the U.S. vary widely. In many cases frequent trips into the U.S. actually tends to be a strong positive factor, since each of those trips are proof-positive of actual presence in Canada that day, and also strongly imply presence in Canada the previous day if not more than that. In conjunction with employment for a Canadian employer, this tends to help make a rather strong case.

But there are other factors which can push the needle in the other direction. DEPENDS.

In any event, even if ten or a hundred, let alone just one person, report no problem despite defying the instructions to detail dates of all trips outside Canada, IT WOULD BE FOOLISH TO FOLLOW SUCH AN EXAMPLE.

I am not judging the credibility of any particular anecdotal report here. No need to do that. There is little doubt, no real debate, when applying for a new PR card the burden of proof in showing RO compliance is on the PR, and the instructions are clear enough. It is always possible to keep track of each and every trip. PRs will be wise to do precisely that. And then completely and accurately report their trips.

There are many ways to explain possible exceptions, assuming they are truthful. Again, no need to go there. PRs should keep careful record of all trips outside Canada, even if engaged in a daily commute to the U.S., and accurately report all trips when applying for a new PR card and especially when applying for citizenship.

When in doubt, follow the instructions; otherwise, yep, follow the instructions.

Suggestions that it is OK to do otherwise should be largely if not totally disregarded.
Agreed!

For people who went TLDR;

Don't follow advice that includes chance or oversight. Follow proper process.
 

vnps1903

Star Member
Sep 3, 2018
94
3
Hi Radium Congrats ! When did u Chk? Any e mails or e CAS? Great to know weekends getting full of pleasant surprises.
 

Radium

Star Member
Apr 12, 2013
144
19
Category........
Visa Office......
CPC-M
NOC Code......
INLAND
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
September 18, 2014
AOR Received.
May 28. 2015
Med's Done....
August 18, 2014
Hi Radium Congrats ! When did u Chk? Any e mails or e CAS? Great to know weekends getting full of pleasant surprises.
I checked it just a few hours back after reading someone’s post that said their card was mailed on September 29.
I did check ecas on Friday evening but there wasn’t any update only “processing” and “decision made”
I haven’t received an email from cic that my card was mailed only update on ecas
 

jagga

Hero Member
Feb 25, 2011
488
13
Canada
Category........
FAM
Visa Office......
New delhi
App. Filed.......
10 June 2014
Med's Request
2 feb 2016- remedical
Med's Done....
5 feb 2016-remedical
Interview........
1 feb 2016 (Application approved)
Passport Req..
8 MAY 2017
VISA ISSUED...
17 MAY 2017
LANDED..........
20 MAY 2017
Hyperbole Warning: WHEN SOMEONE STATES THAT OTHERS CAN RELY ON HOW THINGS WENT FOR HER, THAT IS AN EXAGGERATION OVER THE LINE.

A to-be-clear post.

Not all hyperbole or exaggeration means an anecdotal report lacks credibility. Sure, obviously it is totally unlikely anyone entered the U.S. "thousands" of times since there are only 1825 days in the relevant five years (at the high end, hundreds of times is the more likely scenario, even for daily commuters recognizing, however, some might actually reach a thousand trips), and of course the number of trips can always be counted, the number is never "countless."

Many exaggerations can be put in context and the report understood well enough despite the hyperbole.

The more important caveat, however, is that it is rarely possible to extrapolate what is likely to happen to another PR based on what has happened for one PR, let alone declare what will happen. Even when the proposition is not mired in exaggerations.

The scenarios in which PRs are frequent travelers to the U.S. vary widely. In many cases frequent trips into the U.S. actually tends to be a strong positive factor, since each of those trips are proof-positive of actual presence in Canada that day, and also strongly imply presence in Canada the previous day if not more than that. In conjunction with employment for a Canadian employer, this tends to help make a rather strong case.

But there are other factors which can push the needle in the other direction. DEPENDS.

In any event, even if ten or a hundred, let alone just one person, report no problem despite defying the instructions to detail dates of all trips outside Canada, IT WOULD BE FOOLISH TO FOLLOW SUCH AN EXAMPLE.

I am not judging the credibility of any particular anecdotal report here. No need to do that. There is little doubt, no real debate, when applying for a new PR card the burden of proof in showing RO compliance is on the PR, and the instructions are clear enough. It is always possible to keep track of each and every trip. PRs will be wise to do precisely that. And then completely and accurately report their trips.

There are many ways to explain possible exceptions, assuming they are truthful. Again, no need to go there. PRs should keep careful record of all trips outside Canada, even if engaged in a daily commute to the U.S., and accurately report all trips when applying for a new PR card and especially when applying for citizenship.

When in doubt, follow the instructions; otherwise, yep, follow the instructions.

Suggestions that it is OK to do otherwise should be largely if not totally disregarded.
Hi dpenabill,, thanks for the information. After reading your post i have removed suggestion part. Now i am thinking of applying citizenship,as i was just waiting for pr card renewal.
What should i do for usa entries as i just have 6 month old record of entries, nothing else. I travel very frequently to usa, sometimes twice a day. thanks:)
 

dpenabill

VIP Member
Apr 2, 2010
4,978
2,128
Hi dpenabill,, thanks for the information. After reading your post i have removed suggestion part. Now i am thinking of applying citizenship,as i was just waiting for pr card renewal.
What should i do for usa entries as i just have 6 month old record of entries, nothing else. I travel very frequently to usa, sometimes twice a day. thanks:)
There is no good substitute for keeping complete records. Each PR has what no one else in the world, person or organization, has, and that is the opportunity to keep a complete and accurate record of every border crossing. The PR is the one individual in the whole world who is there each and every time.

And of course IRCC is fully cognizant of this. And, indeed, this is part (just part) of the explanation for why the burden is on the PR, whether attendant a PR RO compliance examination or in applying for citizenship, to completely and accurately report travel history.

IRCC and CBSA have a number of tools to check the completeness and accuracy of what a PR reports. The tools include CBSA history of entries into Canada, access to U.S. records of entries into the U.S. (for non-U.S. citizens, probably even citizens in the near future), and various other sources of corroborating information. BUT in most cases IRCC relies on the PR's report so long as all that other information does not reveal omissions or inaccuracies, and that is what IRCC is ordinarily looking to that other information for, to see whether something shows the PR has failed to accurately and completely declare all travel.

Which is NOT to say that IRCC will unreasonably ignore obvious evidence and indications of presence for periods of time the PR's reporting is sketchy or incomplete. IRCC will exercise its discretion to make reasonable inferences from what is known. Thus, for example, an unusually large number of border crossing events, readily confirmed by CBSA or U.S. records, tends to show the individual is indeed in Canada a lot, and in conjunction with a baseline of information tending to otherwise indicate a life in Canada, that can make it easy for IRCC to conclude the PR was in Canada for well over the minimum 730 days in five years to meet the RO even though the PR's submissions may have lacked the level of detail requested AND, it should be noted, USUALLY required at least within a fairly close range.

Nonetheless, if you really provided little or no actual travel date history, it is quite remarkable and, I would GUESS very lucky, that your application did not end up in non-routine processing and incur a lengthy processing timeline delay.

My guess is the risk of NOT being so lucky in a citizenship application is high.

That said, some estimating of dates, with explanation, is probably OK in a citizenship application . . . even though it appears IRCC has dropped (I could not find it again recently) its previous FAQ advice that applicants could "estimate" travel history in their citizenship application, so long as they clearly indicated which travel dates are estimated. Obviously, estimating travel history undoubtedly increases the risk of non-routine processing and a much longer timeline. And the more travel history is estimated the greater the risk.

Lowest risk is completely declaring all dates of travel and doing so accurately.

Of course there is a more strict approach to assessing presence in the citizenship application process, given the nature of the status and its lifetime duration, and given that the number of required presence is another full year of days.

Obviously multiple crossings in the same day are no big deal since it is just the day that is reported. (That would involve lots of practice sitting idly in queue I'd expect, so you should be well prepared for the citizenship application process-crawl. I cross the U.S. border way, way less often than I did in the past, perhaps largely due to the social and political environment in that S*hole country, but at least in significant part due to the lines, just the traffic alone let alone the potential examinations.)

In the citizenship forum there are various discussions about how to reconstruct travel history if the prospective applicant has incomplete records. The caution is to be sure to advise or explain this to IRCC; that is, to acknowledge some estimating derived from reconstructing the history as well as one can.

Ordinarily long haul truckers should have logs which would be a huge help in reconstructing the travel history. Others in the forum are more familiar with procedures to obtain U.S. records or CBSA travel history, which will usually fill in most of the gaps (for many, all the gaps, but not for everyone, so you should not rely entirely on this information). For someone who was crossing the border regularly for work, just looking at the work history should help identify much if not most of the travel history. For example, if I knew I was making deliveries in the U.S. five days a week most weeks from March 2016 to June 2018, it would be easy to identify most holidays and remember longer periods of time off, and just use the calendar to identify the vast majority of dates for that two plus year time period.

Trips to the U.S. do not even count as a day absent unless the PR spends two or more consecutive nights in the U.S. (Leaving one day and returning to Canada the next results in ZERO days absence, since the PR is actually physically present in Canada any day the individual is leaving Canada and any day the individual returns to Canada.) Technically all day trips need to be declared. This could be tedious. But tedious is not impossible. Not even impractical.

How much IRCC lets slide varies greatly. There tends to be a good deal of flexibility exercised relative to the PR RO, especially when it is well apparent the PR is well settled and actually living in Canada. Some similar flexibility, but less, is also exercised in citizenship application processing. But as I noted before, the best approach is to follow the rules and give IRCC direct answers for its requests. As best one reasonably can anyway.