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stirredo

Hero Member
Aug 11, 2020
819
1,101
@stirredo

Backtracking on what I said. In Canada, they block your credit card if you make a transaction that is perceived by them to be remotely suspicious. And it takes an hour of waiting on the phone to get your card unblocked. I made a simple VoIP purchase to a US address and they blocked my credit card for that. Just another one of these Canadian things, I guess.
What do you mean a US address? Do you mean you used it in the US?
I now have two credit cards for the same reason. Since I’ll be doing soft landing, I will only be using them for online subscriptions.

I guess I should also think about using Canadian proxy as well.
 
 

ImpatientAlligator

Hero Member
Sep 7, 2021
776
1,360
What do you mean a US address? Do you mean you used it in the US?
I now have two credit cards for the same reason. Since I’ll be doing soft landing, I will only be using them for online subscriptions.

I guess I should also think about using Canadian proxy as well.
I bought a VoIP account which only services US zip codes and paid in USD. They thought that a Canadian credit card doing that was fishy.
 

ElegantVegetable

Star Member
Oct 15, 2021
163
244
Hi all, we’re again in a soup after being shown hope of some progress by IRCC.
AOR - 6th Feb 2021
Remed - 21st May’22 (remed passed - 29th May’22)
ADR requested - 25th May’22
ADR submitted- 31st May’22

Our ADR status then changed to “documents you have submitted have been uploaded”.

It’s been 40 days now with the same status, no other updates. Raised two webforms as well but no response.
Is anyone else on the same boat as we are?
This wait is killing us again!
I'm nearing a month after ADR, in same boat. I guess we're in that phase when they make people wait for another six months and then asks for Remed, PCC and POF again and then issues PPR. They're even lazy than sloth and slower than snail.
 
 

sean_fraser

Member
Jan 20, 2022
13
2
It is difficult, but don't be under the impression that you need to be proficient in french to get the 50 months. You need a B2, which is nowhere even in the realm of proficiency. B2 in english, for example, is the person you make fun of for having trash english. B2 is a joke in terms of actual language ability.

Took me about a year, about 12-15 hours a week, to get to B2. A1 and A2 took 2 months each. and anywhere from 4-5 months for B1 and B2 each. It kind of gets muddy because I was using multiple sources to learn.

If I remember my calculations right, a B1 in all four skills will get you a total of 4 points. A B2 in all four will get you 12 points plus the 50 point bonus. I don't think A1 and A2 gets you any points. I think basically you'll get anywhere from 4 to 10 points depending on whatever combination of B1 and B2 scores you get. That took me over 6 months to get to that level. Could take you less, could take you more.

If you're not planning on putting time into it and at least aiming for B2s across the board, I wouldn't waste your time trying.
Can you please share what resources you used to learn French and in which order you referred them? I have started learning French. I have finished a couple of trees in Duolingo. There are total 10 of them. I wanted to see what worked out for you and maybe follow that. @ElvisRamaj I would really appreciate your inputs as well. Thank you guys.
 
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mushymush

Champion Member
Oct 19, 2020
1,112
1,644
Can you please share what resources you used to learn French and in which order you referred them? I have started learning French. I have finished a couple of trees in Duolingo. There are total 10 of them. I wanted to see what worked out for you and maybe follow that. @ElvisRamaj I would really appreciate your inputs as well. Thank you guys.
Too lazy to type this over and over, so I'll copy paste what I posted for someone else a few months ago:

I could give you my entire process but that won't help you much at this stage. Your best bet would be to take intensive classes at your local alliance francaise if you have one. Depending on your country, this could be a bit expensive. The A1 intensive cost me $1200 when I lived in the US. More affordable would be to find a tutor on italki. They'll be one hour lessons and it'll be upto you to put in at least an hour a day outside of classes. Then use an app like tandem for language exchange. It is fairly difficult to find dedicated conversation partners, but you need to start speaking as soon as possible.

Given that you're already 470, you can get away with a low B2 which would give you 12 extra points. A high B2 gets you 62 points, there is no in between. I started from scratch and was ready to pass the exam after 10-12 months. The last 3 of thsoe were just to cross the high B2 barrier. So it is very realistic for you to be able to get to a low B2 in 5ish months. However, I did study for 2-3 hours a day, and used my spare time listening to french podcasts, doing vocabulary flashcards etc. If you want me to get into more depth, I'd be happy to help, but I don't want to hijack this thread.

Edit: There's also a post somewhere of someone, a mother with a young child, who worked fulltime, and passed the exam after 6 months of starting. That post was my inspiration to start learning.

Unfortunately there is no secret sauce. Duolingo is fine as a supplement, but even finishing it from start to finish only gets you to A2. And it's pretty inefficient. And it will not actually help you with the 4 competencies (writing, speaking, reading and listening), especially the first two, which are the most difficult. After I finished my B2 studies, I also enrolled for the Lingoda sprint marathon (look it up on google). It does cost $1000, but you get a 100% refund if you attend all classes for 3 months. This was just so I could cross the low B2 to high B2 barrier. Any specific methods and techniques will only be useful once you're a high B1. Until then, take lessons, and most importantly, start speaking as soon as possible.
 
 

Azeem2004

Member
Aug 29, 2021
14
5
AOR 03 aug 21
Cor pakistan
Pvo edmonton
Sec vancouver
1st Medical passed 9th dec 21
Bio metric 9th dec
14 feb GU eligibility passed
13th May GU security passed
7th june GU criminality passed
8th june request for remedical
9th june ADR for PCC and Child fees
18th june remedical done
20th june we are reviewing your additional documents
24th june re medical passed at 8 pm PST
24th June received anothet GU at 11 pm PST but no nothing in Portal.

When should i expect PPR.
 

seadrag0n

Champion Member
Mar 6, 2018
2,622
2,373
Too lazy to type this over and over, so I'll copy paste what I posted for someone else a few months ago:

I could give you my entire process but that won't help you much at this stage. Your best bet would be to take intensive classes at your local alliance francaise if you have one. Depending on your country, this could be a bit expensive. The A1 intensive cost me $1200 when I lived in the US. More affordable would be to find a tutor on italki. They'll be one hour lessons and it'll be upto you to put in at least an hour a day outside of classes. Then use an app like tandem for language exchange. It is fairly difficult to find dedicated conversation partners, but you need to start speaking as soon as possible.

Given that you're already 470, you can get away with a low B2 which would give you 12 extra points. A high B2 gets you 62 points, there is no in between. I started from scratch and was ready to pass the exam after 10-12 months. The last 3 of thsoe were just to cross the high B2 barrier. So it is very realistic for you to be able to get to a low B2 in 5ish months. However, I did study for 2-3 hours a day, and used my spare time listening to french podcasts, doing vocabulary flashcards etc. If you want me to get into more depth, I'd be happy to help, but I don't want to hijack this thread.

Edit: There's also a post somewhere of someone, a mother with a young child, who worked fulltime, and passed the exam after 6 months of starting. That post was my inspiration to start learning.

Unfortunately there is no secret sauce. Duolingo is fine as a supplement, but even finishing it from start to finish only gets you to A2. And it's pretty inefficient. And it will not actually help you with the 4 competencies (writing, speaking, reading and listening), especially the first two, which are the most difficult. After I finished my B2 studies, I also enrolled for the Lingoda sprint marathon (look it up on google). It does cost $1000, but you get a 100% refund if you attend all classes for 3 months. This was just so I could cross the low B2 to high B2 barrier. Any specific methods and techniques will only be useful once you're a high B1. Until then, take lessons, and most importantly, start speaking as soon as possible.
What about Alliance Française? There is one in my city in India so they should have a good presence in other countries also.
 

mushymush

Champion Member
Oct 19, 2020
1,112
1,644
What about Alliance Française? There is one in my city in India so they should have a good presence in other countries also.
The A1 intensive that I took was at an Alliance Francaise. The issue is most of them don't offer intensives, and the ones that do aren't intensive enough. My A1 intensive was 3 months long. And A1 shouldn't take more than 2 months imo. So taking classes at AF actually slowed me down. Found a private tutor (fairly cheap in my country) plus another one on Italki for exam specific prep. Significantly better than anything AF can offer
 
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littlestar19

Star Member
May 9, 2022
101
85
Too lazy to type this over and over, so I'll copy paste what I posted for someone else a few months ago:

I could give you my entire process but that won't help you much at this stage. Your best bet would be to take intensive classes at your local alliance francaise if you have one. Depending on your country, this could be a bit expensive. The A1 intensive cost me $1200 when I lived in the US. More affordable would be to find a tutor on italki. They'll be one hour lessons and it'll be upto you to put in at least an hour a day outside of classes. Then use an app like tandem for language exchange. It is fairly difficult to find dedicated conversation partners, but you need to start speaking as soon as possible.

Given that you're already 470, you can get away with a low B2 which would give you 12 extra points. A high B2 gets you 62 points, there is no in between. I started from scratch and was ready to pass the exam after 10-12 months. The last 3 of thsoe were just to cross the high B2 barrier. So it is very realistic for you to be able to get to a low B2 in 5ish months. However, I did study for 2-3 hours a day, and used my spare time listening to french podcasts, doing vocabulary flashcards etc. If you want me to get into more depth, I'd be happy to help, but I don't want to hijack this thread.

Edit: There's also a post somewhere of someone, a mother with a young child, who worked fulltime, and passed the exam after 6 months of starting. That post was my inspiration to start learning.

Unfortunately there is no secret sauce. Duolingo is fine as a supplement, but even finishing it from start to finish only gets you to A2. And it's pretty inefficient. And it will not actually help you with the 4 competencies (writing, speaking, reading and listening), especially the first two, which are the most difficult. After I finished my B2 studies, I also enrolled for the Lingoda sprint marathon (look it up on google). It does cost $1000, but you get a 100% refund if you attend all classes for 3 months. This was just so I could cross the low B2 to high B2 barrier. Any specific methods and techniques will only be useful once you're a high B1. Until then, take lessons, and most importantly, start speaking as soon as possible.
Must say you guys are amazing!! Always helping and sharing your experiences, which is undoubtedly the best support any novice can get !!