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Chance of getting a job in Canada

harshalrode

Newbie
May 22, 2016
5
0
Hello Members,

As I read the posts in the forum, it looks like not easy to get a job in Canada, even though getting a PR might be possible.

So I want to know experiences of people who already completed PR process.
1. Did you land in Canada after getting a job offer? In such case, though which source you got a job? Canadian Job bank, Or self search on other job portals like Monster etc...Or through reference (network)

OR

2. Did you land in Canada with PR and then started searching job? In such case, what was a source of getting a job?

What is recommended?
Please share your experience to get the real picture.
 

sridharcw

Full Member
Nov 20, 2014
27
22
harshalrode said:
Hello Members,

As I read the posts in the forum, it looks like not easy to get a job in Canada, even though getting a PR might be possible.

So I want to know experiences of people who already completed PR process.
1. Did you land in Canada after getting a job offer? In such case, though which source you got a job? Canadian Job bank, Or self search on other job portals like Monster etc...Or through reference (network)

OR

2. Did you land in Canada with PR and then started searching job? In such case, what was a source of getting a job?

What is recommended?
Please share your experience to get the real picture.
Hi harshalrode,

I can answer based on my own experience, but individual situations can vary.

I don't belong to the 1st group. However, I have heard from some people in specialized IT/telecom fields that they received a job offer. From what I gather and based on assumptions I guess companies with high shortage of skill in Canada would provide offers. To cut long story short the employer has to do lot of paper work and costs to prove they have a serious shortage of that skill - which practically means this is a very small %age.

Coming to question 2, I landed with a PR and did a lot of preparations in terms of bridge training, interviewing techniques, etc. I decided to take some odd jobs including working for a coffee shop. But prior to that I did some networking in my field, had a mentor, did some volunteering, etc. These activities helped me to meet people, understand the culture and get inputs from experienced people to appreciate the cultural aspects and know how to fine-tune myself to get hired.
The sources can be multiple - ranging from online job websites to local newspaper ads to classifieds (Kijiji, etc.). The key thing to note is your ability to customize your resume and offer yourself as the right candidate/fit for a given role. Essentially, for every application or job you customize your resume as well as your cover letter. This is too much of hard work but pays well - and if you wanna simplify it make 4-5 formats for different roles thereby saving time and energy. In many cases if you are overqualified you will not even get the initial interview, so getting hired is a remote possibility. So at times you need to right-size your experience and project yourself as a keen learner and good resource to bank upon.

The biggest dilemma faced by new immigrants is "How soon you want to take up and job" or "Would you settle for a lower level/role compared to what you did in the past?". The answer to these questions depends on your personal situation, financial condition, etc. In my case I decided to go for a survival job as my savings were depleting, but later by God's grace and good timing I moved on to an accounting role with a property management firm. If your financial situation does not permit you to stay without a job for another 6 months you have to plan and make a pragmatic decision - go for a slightly lower role or a survival job for 2 reasons - 1) you cannot drag on doing job search - your bank balance is going down already & 2) Try getting a survival job (retail store, coffee shop, electronic store, etc). Survival job is not good as a long-term career option but it gives you two advantages 1) Canadian experience although its not in your field and 2) some money and exposure to people, culture, contacts, industry developments, general knowledge, language/communication skills, etc. Once you get going you need to schedule your time smartly to keep buffer days for interviews/job search/networking so that one day you can make the right switch.
I hope I've given you the real picture and the right inputs.
Wish you all the best.
 

RK2017

Star Member
Feb 20, 2017
139
24
Montreal
Job Offer........
Yes
Hi harshalrode,

I can answer based on my own experience, but individual situations can vary.

I don't belong to the 1st group. However, I have heard from some people in specialized IT/telecom fields that they received a job offer. From what I gather and based on assumptions I guess companies with high shortage of skill in Canada would provide offers. To cut long story short the employer has to do lot of paper work and costs to prove they have a serious shortage of that skill - which practically means this is a very small %age.

Coming to question 2, I landed with a PR and did a lot of preparations in terms of bridge training, interviewing techniques, etc. I decided to take some odd jobs including working for a coffee shop. But prior to that I did some networking in my field, had a mentor, did some volunteering, etc. These activities helped me to meet people, understand the culture and get inputs from experienced people to appreciate the cultural aspects and know how to fine-tune myself to get hired.
The sources can be multiple - ranging from online job websites to local newspaper ads to classifieds (Kijiji, etc.). The key thing to note is your ability to customize your resume and offer yourself as the right candidate/fit for a given role. Essentially, for every application or job you customize your resume as well as your cover letter. This is too much of hard work but pays well - and if you wanna simplify it make 4-5 formats for different roles thereby saving time and energy. In many cases if you are overqualified you will not even get the initial interview, so getting hired is a remote possibility. So at times you need to right-size your experience and project yourself as a keen learner and good resource to bank upon.

The biggest dilemma faced by new immigrants is "How soon you want to take up and job" or "Would you settle for a lower level/role compared to what you did in the past?". The answer to these questions depends on your personal situation, financial condition, etc. In my case I decided to go for a survival job as my savings were depleting, but later by God's grace and good timing I moved on to an accounting role with a property management firm. If your financial situation does not permit you to stay without a job for another 6 months you have to plan and make a pragmatic decision - go for a slightly lower role or a survival job for 2 reasons - 1) you cannot drag on doing job search - your bank balance is going down already & 2) Try getting a survival job (retail store, coffee shop, electronic store, etc). Survival job is not good as a long-term career option but it gives you two advantages 1) Canadian experience although its not in your field and 2) some money and exposure to people, culture, contacts, industry developments, general knowledge, language/communication skills, etc. Once you get going you need to schedule your time smartly to keep buffer days for interviews/job search/networking so that one day you can make the right switch.
I hope I've given you the real picture and the right inputs.
Wish you all the best.
Hi , thanks for detail response. Its true and intact to my current situation. its been 6 months and the struggle is on. networking helps a lot during job search. but, are there any forums or platforms to widen the network ?
 

rvg

Newbie
Sep 8, 2017
2
1
Hi harshalrode,

I can answer based on my own experience, but individual situations can vary.

I don't belong to the 1st group. However, I have heard from some people in specialized IT/telecom fields that they received a job offer. From what I gather and based on assumptions I guess companies with high shortage of skill in Canada would provide offers. To cut long story short the employer has to do lot of paper work and costs to prove they have a serious shortage of that skill - which practically means this is a very small %age.

Coming to question 2, I landed with a PR and did a lot of preparations in terms of bridge training, interviewing techniques, etc. I decided to take some odd jobs including working for a coffee shop. But prior to that I did some networking in my field, had a mentor, did some volunteering, etc. These activities helped me to meet people, understand the culture and get inputs from experienced people to appreciate the cultural aspects and know how to fine-tune myself to get hired.
The sources can be multiple - ranging from online job websites to local newspaper ads to classifieds (Kijiji, etc.). The key thing to note is your ability to customize your resume and offer yourself as the right candidate/fit for a given role. Essentially, for every application or job you customize your resume as well as your cover letter. This is too much of hard work but pays well - and if you wanna simplify it make 4-5 formats for different roles thereby saving time and energy. In many cases if you are overqualified you will not even get the initial interview, so getting hired is a remote possibility. So at times you need to right-size your experience and project yourself as a keen learner and good resource to bank upon.

The biggest dilemma faced by new immigrants is "How soon you want to take up and job" or "Would you settle for a lower level/role compared to what you did in the past?". The answer to these questions depends on your personal situation, financial condition, etc. In my case I decided to go for a survival job as my savings were depleting, but later by God's grace and good timing I moved on to an accounting role with a property management firm. If your financial situation does not permit you to stay without a job for another 6 months you have to plan and make a pragmatic decision - go for a slightly lower role or a survival job for 2 reasons - 1) you cannot drag on doing job search - your bank balance is going down already & 2) Try getting a survival job (retail store, coffee shop, electronic store, etc). Survival job is not good as a long-term career option but it gives you two advantages 1) Canadian experience although its not in your field and 2) some money and exposure to people, culture, contacts, industry developments, general knowledge, language/communication skills, etc. Once you get going you need to schedule your time smartly to keep buffer days for interviews/job search/networking so that one day you can make the right switch.
I hope I've given you the real picture and the right inputs.
Wish you all the best.
Hi sridharcw, You have explained the struggle and process of finding a job in Canada in an excellent way. Pretty detailed explanation and guidance. Thank you. Though I have tried most of the things mentioned by you since I have landed in Canada but its been more than 2 months and no luck in finding any job as of now......looks like its more of patience testing. How long do you think it takes to find "any" job in SK, if you have any idea?
 

SimpleMac

Star Member
Nov 22, 2016
153
23
hi All,

I have also landed in oct and looking for jobs but no luck (brampton). Winter is nearing and i really want to start job before that. Any help would be appreciated.
 
Nov 2, 2017
1
0
I attended university in the USA and presently resides there. I am interested in job offers from Canada and need some guidance.
 

scylla

VIP Member
Jun 8, 2010
65,417
9,113
Toronto
Category........
Visa Office......
Buffalo
Job Offer........
Pre-Assessed..
App. Filed.......
28-05-2010
AOR Received.
19-08-2010
File Transfer...
28-06-2010
Passport Req..
01-10-2010
VISA ISSUED...
05-10-2010
LANDED..........
05-10-2010
I attended university in the USA and presently resides there. I am interested in job offers from Canada and need some guidance.
Generally speaking they are extremely hard to get - especially if you have no or limited work experience. If you want to find one, you have to apply for jobs through job sites such as linkedin, indeed, etc.
 

mgnlky

Champion Member
Jan 22, 2016
1,444
215
Vancouver
Category........
FSW
Visa Office......
Ottawa
NOC Code......
1122
Pre-Assessed..
Yes
App. Filed.......
22-12-2016
AOR Received.
22-12-2016
Med's Done....
04-11-2016
Passport Req..
22-3-2017
LANDED..........
04-09-2017
The best tip I can give you is if you are in the IT or any other professional sector, get in touch with recruiters. But also be patient because the job interview/offer process moves very slow in Canada. I moved to Vancouver September 30th and received an offer last night for a job an IT recruiter connected me with.
 

Ginxmix017

Newbie
Nov 27, 2017
7
1
Thunder Bay, ON
An online search in your job area of interest will include businesses that provide those services. Go to these business websites since they may also have a 'careers' section. See if they have any openings or related openings, send in your resume or CV. Use LinkedIn also. Many businesses and recruiters can be found there looking for people to fill jobs. Good luck!
 

Shehzer

Member
May 21, 2018
13
1
What if you get a job offer , and then you get PR .. but when you reach Canada either you or the employer doesn't go well ,and you leave your job or got fired then what ...... How will the process go