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CERTIFIED true copies

Discussion in 'Canadian Experience Class' started by JORGER, May 10, 2012.

  1. Ok, I have everything we need but translations...And now I'm confused...
    www .cic.gc.ca/english/information/applications/guides/5609ETOC.asp (remove space afterwww)
    says:
    Translation of documents
    Any document that is not in English or French must be accompanied by:
    •the English or French translation; and
    •an affidavit from the person who completed the translation; and
    •a certified copy of the original document.
    Note: An affidavit is a document on which the translator has sworn, in the presence of a commissioner authorized to administer oaths in the country in which the translator is living, that the contents of their translation are a true translation and representation of the contents of the original document. Translators who are certified members in good standing of one of the provincial or territorial organizations of translators and interpreters of Canada do not need to supply an affidavit.
    Certified true copies
    To have a photocopy of a document certified, an authorized person must compare the original document to the photocopy and must print the following on the photocopy:
    •“I certify that this is a true copy of the original document”,
    •the name of the original document,
    •the date of the certification,
    •his or her name,
    •his or her official position or title, and
    •his or her signature.
    Who can certify copies?
    Persons authorized to certify copies include the following:
    In Canada:
    •a commissioner of oaths
    •a notary public
    •a justice of the peace
    Outside Canada:
    •a judge
    •a magistrate
    •a notary public
    •an officer of a court of justice
    •a commissioner authorized to administer oaths in the country in which the person is living


    The document checklist IMM5610 by the other hand says "Send a notarized (certified) translation with a copy of the original version" It doesn't ask for notarized or certified copy of the document

    So... What do I need to send?
    A) A notarized translation with a copy of the original document?
    B) an affidavit of the translation AND certified copy of the document?
    C) It is cheaper for me to get new original documents and send those, than the notarization or certification here at Canada, and send them with an affidavit of the translatoror how do i know who is a "Translators who are certified members in good standing of one of the provincial or territorial organizations of translators and interpreters of Canada"
     
  2. From another post, I see you are in Alberta, is that correct?

    Well then, if you want to use a local translator, go to the website of the Association of Translators and Interpreters of Alberta, and use their member directory to find a qualified translator - if you can't find one in your own province, you can use a certified translator in any other province - (But if it's from Spanish to English, you're in luck).

    http://www.atia.ab.ca/index.php/directory

    Of course you don't have to use one of these translators, but then you need the affidavit, so it's just easier of you can.
     
  3. Thanks Jes.
    Yes I think i'm doing the translations with one of them who actually was living at Mexico, so I dont need the affidavit, but I still need the certified copy of the original document
    or should it be notarized? at Mexico you can use both words for the same procedure, but it seems to be a little different here:
    Do I need a Commissioner for Oaths or a Notary Public? According to AMA
    ■If the documents are being used within Alberta, you need a Commissioner for Oaths.
    ■If the documents are being used outside Alberta, you need a Notary Public.
    ■If the document needs to be "certified as a true copy", you need a Notary Public
     
  4. Here, a "notarized" document is the original document where signatures are witnessed by a notary. Certified copy is not an original document. In some places, notaries do both, and "notarized' is the common (if inaccurate) term applied to both.

    Don't worry about wht the AMA says, worry about what CIC says.

    http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/applications/guides/5609ETOC.asp

    Who can certify copies?

    Persons authorized to certify copies include the following:

    In Canada:

    a commissioner of oaths
    a notary public
    a justice of the peace

    Outside Canada:

    a judge
    a magistrate
    a notary public
    an officer of a court of justice
    a commissioner authorized to administer oaths in the country in which the person is living
     

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