I want to visit my boyfriend in Canada
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honeylaine
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Category........: FAM

« on: March 26, 2010, 05:45:10 am »

Hi,
I'm a filipina working in Dubai met and fall inlove with my officemate a french canadian from Montreal, we are 10 months in relationship and living together for 8 months here in Dubai. Next month he is leaving Dubai for good because he got a great opportunity to work in a big company in Montreal. Since we are not married yet, it will be hard for me to go with him. Getting married is not our option for me to go to Canada.

Is there a simple requirement on how to visit him? Can he be my sponsor? what documents should i need to prepare? what is the first step should i do?
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mdan1984
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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2010, 09:22:47 am »

Hi there

I just wanted to give you a heads up to your situation. I understand what it is like to be in your situation. Canada is a very beautiful place to live but unfortunately it is the most strict in regards to getting visas and stuff. Originally, it was the United States that was the hardest country to get a visa, but now it is Canada. To go over there now to visit your 'boyfriend' will not be an easy task.
I am NOT saying it isn't possible, but I am saying that the steps involved are lengthy and if you skip out on or, simply, DONT have then you chances of getting a visa are extremely lower.

I am a Canadian citizen and my wife is Chinese. I know that you are Filipino but you are trying to get to Canada and the requirements will be the same. The other difference is that I was married last year and in your situation, he is your boyfriend. Your situation is going to be really really tough. Sorry to give you bad news  Sad.
My wife knows so many people that get visas for people as their business and so we know sooo much about this process. So, I just saw your post and thought I would spend 25 minuets or so writing a good and clear explanation for you and others to see.
So read carefully if you want to try to apply for a visa to see your boyfriend.

This will be a very good list for someone who is from China trying to visit their boyfriend or husband. But this list will work for people of other countries INCLUDING the Philipinnes I take it.

1. It is not going to be easier. It will be 100 times easier if you were married to him. Because if you are not married to him, the embassy will be afraid that you will go there and not come back. They know that many people try to go there and immigrate. If you were married, then you would be going to see your husband and that is a whole different situation. So the process of proving that you will NOT come back will be a difficult one for him and for you to prove. Can it be done? Yes, but depending on the visa officer you get and the strictness they have set for your country, if you dont provide a material that is needed, you wont get a visa.

2. Because he is your boyfriend, it will be extremely difficult to get a visa to Canada.
I know that you will have to prove your relationship very clearly. Printing out email conversations, MSN chat conversations. Provide many pictures of you guys together (this is a must)
You will also have to prove you will be coming back, so a letter from your work that is stamped and signed by the manager stating that you work with them. Your position and your salary. Another letter from your company that is stamped and signed that allows you a short leave of absence. If it is too long, they will be suspicious that you are going there to immigrate.

Another thing you will want to provide is a property ownership certificate that proves that you have a house. That has a lot of leverage. If they see that then they can see that you have a home to come home too.

Another thing you will have to provide is proof that you have a lot of money in your bank account. If you dont have a lot of money in your bank account, if he wires you money, that is ok. But if the embassy actually checks your account and sees a whole bunch of money suddenly deposited into it, they will be suspicious that it is NOT your own money. These things will cause them to deny you a visa immediately.

Your boyfriend will have to write an invitation letter that is signed by him and NOTARIZED by a notary public. That way the embassy can see that it is true. It is really good if he writes an invitation letter where he declares and guarantees to pay for all of your expenses while you are away. Then get THAT notarized. Then he has to send that original copy through the MAIL to your address in the Philipines. A scanned copy of that kind of letter will not be accepted.

In reaching a decision whether you are elligible for a visa, the visa officer considers several factors, which include:

    * the applicant's travel and identity documents;
    * the reason for travel to Canada and the applicant's contacts there;
    * the applicant's financial means for the trip;
    * the applicant's ties to his or her country of residence, including immigration status, employment and family ties;
    * whether the applicant would be likely to leave Canada at the end of the authorized stay;
    * the applicant's health condition.

Officers make decisions on a case-by-case basis. The onus is on applicants to show that their intentions are genuine.

Other requirements may include:
1. Completed “Application for a Temporary Resident Visa” (IMM 5257). Accompanying children aged 18 years old and above must complete their own application form.

2. Completed “Family Composition Information and Details of Education and Employment” form for the applicant and each accompanying family member who are aged 18 years old and above, completed in English or French AND YOUR countries language

3. Three (3) identical photos of the applicant and each accompanying family member, colour or black and white taken against a plain white or light coloured background within the last 6 months. The frame size is 35mm X 45mm. On the back of one photo in each set, write the name in pinyin and date of birth (day/month/year) of the person appearing in the photo.

4. A valid passport for the applicant and each accompanying family member. There must be one completely blank page other than the last page, available in each passport and each passport must be valid for at least six (6) months prior to travel

5. Two (2) self-addressed adhesive labels with the applicant's current address

6. Two (2) self-addressed adhesive labels with the applicant's current address in Chinese characters (no envelope).

7. “Use of a Representative” form (IMM5476E) if someone has assisted you in making this application.

8. For children less than 18 years old, Parental Letter of Consent from your non-accompanying parent(s) authorizing your travel. This letter should contain the dates of travel and your parent(s)' contact information.

9. If you are employed, a signed original letter on company letterhead from the employer granting leave of absence and including the following information:
• the applicant's name, position, current salary and date of hire; and
• the employer's name and address in Chinese characters as well as the telephone and fax number.

10. If you are retired, a Retirement Certificate indicating the amount of the applicant's pension.

11. If you are a student traveling during periods other than school holidays, an original letter from your school confirming that you are enrolled and in good standing and that the school has approved your absence.

12. Original bank documents showing financial history over several months (e.g. Certificates of Deposits, bank books, etc.).

13. Evidence of assets your country (e.g. original house property certificate, vehicle registration, etc.).

14. Proof of relationship with the inviter in Canada (e.g. copy of birth certificate, copy of marriage certificate, proof of correspondence, photos, emails  etc.)

15. An invitation letter stating the purpose and duration of the visit. This letter should be original and sent in the mail to the applicant in your country. This has more leverage then just writing a letter, signing it, scanning it and sending it via email to the applicant. If possible for the INVITER to write on the letter that he/she will provide all expenses to the applicant, that would be good. But the applicant STILL has to provide his/her own financial proof that would be enough in case of emergency.

16.  A list showing the number of people in inviter's household.

17. A copy of the inviter's citizenship (eg. Birth certificate and passport)

18. Proof of inviter's income and financial situation in the form of independent, third-party documentation from a Canadian source which is reliable or easily verifiable. For example, but not limited to: Canada Revenue Agency Notice of Assessments [NOA], employment letters showing salary, pay stubs, banks statements, Statements of Remuneration Paid or financial statements prepared by a licensed professional.

I hope this helps. If you have any other questions, please ask me. I am not sure if i will be able to answer all of your questions but I will try.

Blessings

Mike
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job_seeker
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« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2010, 10:07:26 am »

Hi,
I'm a filipina working in Dubai met and fall inlove with my officemate a french canadian from Montreal, we are 10 months in relationship and living together for 8 months here in Dubai. Next month he is leaving Dubai for good because he got a great opportunity to work in a big company in Montreal. Since we are not married yet, it will be hard for me to go with him. Getting married is not our option for me to go to Canada.

Is there a simple requirement on how to visit him? Can he be my sponsor? what documents should i need to prepare? what is the first step should i do?

As you've lived together for less than a year, he can't sponsor you under common law. You can apply for a visitor visa but you must show proof of ties such as a good job, family, property, enough reasons to want to go back after your allowed visit is over.  He can give you a notarized invitation in the form of an undertaking but you must have enough funds to show you can do the trip on your own.
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justheart
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« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2010, 12:52:03 pm »

hey.. this is just my opinion, you being a girlfriend of a canadian citizen doesn't mean to them, what they just want is for you to prove that you'll be staying in canada only from authorized date. just a piece of advice, dont apply for a trv if you are not in the country of your residency. if you have long vacation from your work, return to philippines and apply for a trv there and show the embassy your flight ticket going back to dubai along with your supporting documents.. dont loose hope, a person with a good intentions always rewarded. anyway, applying a visa in us,canada,uk,australia etc.. its the same, there are no levels of difficulty they are just doing their job with the same objectives.  Smiley. cic.gc.ca/english/resources/manuals/op/op11-eng.pdf  hope this will help.
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pniroula
Guest
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2010, 01:51:25 pm »

Hi there

I just wanted to give you a heads up to your situation. I understand what it is like to be in your situation. Canada is a very beautiful place to live but unfortunately it is the most strict in regards to getting visas and stuff. Originally, it was the United States that was the hardest country to get a visa, but now it is Canada. To go over there now to visit your 'boyfriend' will not be an easy task.
I am NOT saying it isn't possible, but I am saying that the steps involved are lengthy and if you skip out on or, simply, DONT have then you chances of getting a visa are extremely lower.

I am a Canadian citizen and my wife is Chinese. I know that you are Filipino but you are trying to get to Canada and the requirements will be the same. The other difference is that I was married last year and in your situation, he is your boyfriend. Your situation is going to be really really tough. Sorry to give you bad news  Sad.
My wife knows so many people that get visas for people as their business and so we know sooo much about this process. So, I just saw your post and thought I would spend 25 minuets or so writing a good and clear explanation for you and others to see.
So read carefully if you want to try to apply for a visa to see your boyfriend.

This will be a very good list for someone who is from China trying to visit their boyfriend or husband. But this list will work for people of other countries INCLUDING the Philipinnes I take it.

1. It is not going to be easier. It will be 100 times easier if you were married to him. Because if you are not married to him, the embassy will be afraid that you will go there and not come back. They know that many people try to go there and immigrate. If you were married, then you would be going to see your husband and that is a whole different situation. So the process of proving that you will NOT come back will be a difficult one for him and for you to prove. Can it be done? Yes, but depending on the visa officer you get and the strictness they have set for your country, if you dont provide a material that is needed, you wont get a visa.

2. Because he is your boyfriend, it will be extremely difficult to get a visa to Canada.
I know that you will have to prove your relationship very clearly. Printing out email conversations, MSN chat conversations. Provide many pictures of you guys together (this is a must)
You will also have to prove you will be coming back, so a letter from your work that is stamped and signed by the manager stating that you work with them. Your position and your salary. Another letter from your company that is stamped and signed that allows you a short leave of absence. If it is too long, they will be suspicious that you are going there to immigrate.

Another thing you will want to provide is a property ownership certificate that proves that you have a house. That has a lot of leverage. If they see that then they can see that you have a home to come home too.

Another thing you will have to provide is proof that you have a lot of money in your bank account. If you dont have a lot of money in your bank account, if he wires you money, that is ok. But if the embassy actually checks your account and sees a whole bunch of money suddenly deposited into it, they will be suspicious that it is NOT your own money. These things will cause them to deny you a visa immediately.

Your boyfriend will have to write an invitation letter that is signed by him and NOTARIZED by a notary public. That way the embassy can see that it is true. It is really good if he writes an invitation letter where he declares and guarantees to pay for all of your expenses while you are away. Then get THAT notarized. Then he has to send that original copy through the MAIL to your address in the Philipines. A scanned copy of that kind of letter will not be accepted.

In reaching a decision whether you are elligible for a visa, the visa officer considers several factors, which include:

    * the applicant's travel and identity documents;
    * the reason for travel to Canada and the applicant's contacts there;
    * the applicant's financial means for the trip;
    * the applicant's ties to his or her country of residence, including immigration status, employment and family ties;
    * whether the applicant would be likely to leave Canada at the end of the authorized stay;
    * the applicant's health condition.

Officers make decisions on a case-by-case basis. The onus is on applicants to show that their intentions are genuine.

Other requirements may include:
1. Completed “Application for a Temporary Resident Visa” (IMM 5257). Accompanying children aged 18 years old and above must complete their own application form.

2. Completed “Family Composition Information and Details of Education and Employment” form for the applicant and each accompanying family member who are aged 18 years old and above, completed in English or French AND YOUR countries language

3. Three (3) identical photos of the applicant and each accompanying family member, colour or black and white taken against a plain white or light coloured background within the last 6 months. The frame size is 35mm X 45mm. On the back of one photo in each set, write the name in pinyin and date of birth (day/month/year) of the person appearing in the photo.

4. A valid passport for the applicant and each accompanying family member. There must be one completely blank page other than the last page, available in each passport and each passport must be valid for at least six (6) months prior to travel

5. Two (2) self-addressed adhesive labels with the applicant's current address

6. Two (2) self-addressed adhesive labels with the applicant's current address in Chinese characters (no envelope).

7. “Use of a Representative” form (IMM5476E) if someone has assisted you in making this application.

8. For children less than 18 years old, Parental Letter of Consent from your non-accompanying parent(s) authorizing your travel. This letter should contain the dates of travel and your parent(s)' contact information.

9. If you are employed, a signed original letter on company letterhead from the employer granting leave of absence and including the following information:
• the applicant's name, position, current salary and date of hire; and
• the employer's name and address in Chinese characters as well as the telephone and fax number.

10. If you are retired, a Retirement Certificate indicating the amount of the applicant's pension.

11. If you are a student traveling during periods other than school holidays, an original letter from your school confirming that you are enrolled and in good standing and that the school has approved your absence.

12. Original bank documents showing financial history over several months (e.g. Certificates of Deposits, bank books, etc.).

13. Evidence of assets your country (e.g. original house property certificate, vehicle registration, etc.).

14. Proof of relationship with the inviter in Canada (e.g. copy of birth certificate, copy of marriage certificate, proof of correspondence, photos, emails  etc.)

15. An invitation letter stating the purpose and duration of the visit. This letter should be original and sent in the mail to the applicant in your country. This has more leverage then just writing a letter, signing it, scanning it and sending it via email to the applicant. If possible for the INVITER to write on the letter that he/she will provide all expenses to the applicant, that would be good. But the applicant STILL has to provide his/her own financial proof that would be enough in case of emergency.

16.  A list showing the number of people in inviter's household.

17. A copy of the inviter's citizenship (eg. Birth certificate and passport)

18. Proof of inviter's income and financial situation in the form of independent, third-party documentation from a Canadian source which is reliable or easily verifiable. For example, but not limited to: Canada Revenue Agency Notice of Assessments [NOA], employment letters showing salary, pay stubs, banks statements, Statements of Remuneration Paid or financial statements prepared by a licensed professional.

I hope this helps. If you have any other questions, please ask me. I am not sure if i will be able to answer all of your questions but I will try.

Blessings

Mike

Hi Mike
This is really great piece of information for everyone who wants their bf/gf/spouse to visit Canada.
Thank you so much
Cheers!
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mdan1984
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Posts: 31
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« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2010, 10:02:35 am »

No Problem

It is my pleasure to share my experience with the embassy. It can be easy and it can be difficult. Depends on each persons situation.

Blessings

Mike Smiley
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mdan1984
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Posts: 31
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« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2010, 10:10:08 am »

hey.. this is just my opinion, you being a girlfriend of a canadian citizen doesn't mean to them, what they just want is for you to prove that you'll be staying in canada only from authorized date. just a piece of advice, dont apply for a trv if you are not in the country of your residency. if you have long vacation from your work, return to philippines and apply for a trv there and show the embassy your flight ticket going back to dubai along with your supporting documents.. dont loose hope, a person with a good intentions always rewarded. anyway, applying a visa in us,canada,uk,australia etc.. its the same, there are no levels of difficulty they are just doing their job with the same objectives.  Smiley. cic.gc.ca/english/resources/manuals/op/op11-eng.pdf  hope this will help.

Hi there. You are right of the fact of not losing hope. But the relationship means everything to the embassy  Smiley. If it was a husband she was going to visit it would be 100 times easier. I have got proof of that. For different situations there are different levels of difficulty so I just told her the truth of what I went through.
I have a friend that is in the same situation as me but he is a Chinese citzen trying to visit his Canadian girlfriend. He proved EVERYTHING to the best of his abilities. They proved their ties beyond a shadow of a doubt, did all the paperwork they needed, And they were able to provide more information due to the properties they own and the money they both have. The embassy didn't grant the visa to EVERYONES surprise.
My wife is Chinese, and I am Canadian. She got the visiting visa no problem. They didn't even look at all the materials. It was good enough for them to know that we were married.
Because simply put, it is natural to want to go and visit your husband. They normally wont deny visas for that reason unless the materials that you get together are lacking or insufficient

Cheers  Smiley
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pniroula
Guest
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2010, 10:57:34 am »

No Problem

It is my pleasure to share my experience with the embassy. It can be easy and it can be difficult. Depends on each persons situation.

Blessings

Mike Smiley

Hi Mike
I wanted to send you PM but your inbox is full. I have few questions that I wanted to discuss with you. How can I contact you?
Thanks
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pniroula
Guest
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2010, 11:18:16 am »

Hi Mike
I wanted to send you PM but your inbox is full. I have few questions that I wanted to discuss with you. How can I contact you?
Thanks

Hi Mike

Really great to read your personal experience on TRV issues. Got lots of genuine information through this thread

This is my situation...

I have some kind of similar situation but I am married. I have an international student studying here since last 7 months. I am married a year ago. I invited my wife in October 2009 a month after I was in Canada but TRV was rejected with same generic reasons. Now she is going to apply this July with lots of supporting documents stating that she will return back after visiting me.
I also heard that once TRV is rejected, it is quite difficult to get unless strong documents is provided. Some people at Canadavisa.com forum also suggested my spouse to apply "open work permit" instead of TRV. Once she gets OWP she is eligible automatically for TRV.

What do you think of this idea? Should I ask her to stick to TRV or apply for OWP?
Please suggest some idea if you have experience anything like this.

Thanks a lot
Cheers
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PMM
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« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2010, 11:58:45 am »

Hi

Hi Mike

Really great to read your personal experience on TRV issues. Got lots of genuine information through this thread

This is my situation...

I have some kind of similar situation but I am married. I have an international student studying here since last 7 months. I am married a year ago. I invited my wife in October 2009 a month after I was in Canada but TRV was rejected with same generic reasons. Now she is going to apply this July with lots of supporting documents stating that she will return back after visiting me.
I also heard that once TRV is rejected, it is quite difficult to get unless strong documents is provided. Some people at Canadavisa.com forum also suggested my spouse to apply "open work permit" instead of TRV. Once she gets OWP she is eligible automatically for TRV.

What do you think of this idea? Should I ask her to stick to TRV or apply for OWP?
Please suggest some idea if you have experience anything like this.

Thanks a lot
Cheers


As you were previously told, she needs to apply for a TRV anyhow, she can apply for an OWP at the same time.  But if she is applying for an OWP it will be obvious to CIC/CHC that her visit won't be temporary.

PMM
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PMM
pniroula
Guest
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2010, 12:24:56 pm »

Hi

As you were previously told, she needs to apply for a TRV anyhow, she can apply for an OWP at the same time.  But if she is applying for an OWP it will be obvious to CIC/CHC that her visit won't be temporary.

PMM

Hi PMM Thanks again! I was bit confused on this issue...Thanks for the clarification!
Cheers
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justheart
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« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2010, 01:08:46 pm »

Hi there. You are right of the fact of not losing hope. But the relationship means everything to the embassy  Smiley. If it was a husband she was going to visit it would be 100 times easier. I have got proof of that. For different situations there are different levels of difficulty so I just told her the truth of what I went through.
I have a friend that is in the same situation as me but he is a Chinese citzen trying to visit his Canadian girlfriend. He proved EVERYTHING to the best of his abilities. They proved their ties beyond a shadow of a doubt, did all the paperwork they needed, And they were able to provide more information due to the properties they own and the money they both have. The embassy didn't grant the visa to EVERYONES surprise.
My wife is Chinese, and I am Canadian. She got the visiting visa no problem. They didn't even look at all the materials. It was good enough for them to know that we were married.
Because simply put, it is natural to want to go and visit your husband. They normally wont deny visas for that reason unless the materials that you get together are lacking or insufficient

Cheers  Smiley


hi Smiley i respect your opinion too. im just confuse cause i read some of the posts here that they find it more difficult to get in if they plan to visit their spouse, well anyway its really a case to case basis. wow congrats to your wife having a visa. is it single entry/multiple? mind if i ask?
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toby
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Posts: 1678
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Category........: FAM
Visa Office......: Hong Kong
App. Filed.......: November 2009
Med's Done....: October 2009 and  15 April 2011
Interview........: 4 April 2011
Passport Req..: 4 April 2011
VISA ISSUED...: 7 July 2011
LANDED..........: 15 July 2011

« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2010, 07:33:47 pm »

Hi there. You are right of the fact of not losing hope. But the relationship means everything to the embassy  Smiley. If it was a husband she was going to visit it would be 100 times easier. I have got proof of that. For different situations there are different levels of difficulty so I just told her the truth of what I went through.
I have a friend that is in the same situation as me but he is a Chinese citzen trying to visit his Canadian girlfriend. He proved EVERYTHING to the best of his abilities. They proved their ties beyond a shadow of a doubt, did all the paperwork they needed, And they were able to provide more information due to the properties they own and the money they both have. The embassy didn't grant the visa to EVERYONES surprise.
My wife is Chinese, and I am Canadian. She got the visiting visa no problem. They didn't even look at all the materials. It was good enough for them to know that we were married.
Because simply put, it is natural to want to go and visit your husband. They normally wont deny visas for that reason unless the materials that you get together are lacking or insufficient

Cheers  Smiley


Mike: I don't understand the logic CIC uses. You say (and I think you are right) that in granting a visitor's visa, Canada mainly wants to know that the visitor will return to the home country, and not stay in Canada  beyond the visa expiry date. 

Then why does it help to show how strong the relationship is between boyfriend and girlfriend, or (better yet in your assessment) between husband and wife? Surely the strength of the relationship tempts the visitor to stay in Canada, even after the visitor visa expires?

I talked to an immigration lawyer a long time ago, and he said that once a couple applies for residency (thus declaring their intent to be together in Canada), it is very difficult to get a visitor's visa, because Canada is afraid that if the residency is denied, the visitor will be tempted to stay illicitly in Canada. In other words, any strong ties to Canada (and having a spouse or boyfriend/girlfriend in Canada is certainly a strong tie) will actually make a visitor's visa more difficult to get.

This suggests that an application for a visitor's visa should stress the ties making the visitor return to the home country, and NOT stress the ties to Canada (e.g. boyfriend or girlfriend).  Nothing much one can do about being married -- must not lie in the application -- but in the case of a boyfriend/girlfriend, it is difficult to prove the relationship exists, so no need to emphasize it.

Then there are those couples who want to unite in Canada by means of a visitor's visa, then get married in Canada and apply for residency inland.  Now THAT woudl be difficult to explain to CIC!!   Tongue




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Nov 09 Application to Mississauga
Nov 09 Approved; sent to Hong Kong.
Interview April 4, 2011 (so slow!!). Passed.
15 April 2011 New medical done.
7 July 2011  COPR received.
15 July 2011 landed in Vancouver. At last.
yoshimura
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« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2010, 10:12:24 am »

Why can't they introduce a law whereby the invitee can be legally held accountable if the visitor does not return? It should be an option. Like you have a 100% chance of getting a TVR, but if you overstay, the sponsor goes to jail.

Or just get rid of borders.


*frustrated*
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toby
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******

Posts: 1678
Ratings: +92
Category........: FAM
Visa Office......: Hong Kong
App. Filed.......: November 2009
Med's Done....: October 2009 and  15 April 2011
Interview........: 4 April 2011
Passport Req..: 4 April 2011
VISA ISSUED...: 7 July 2011
LANDED..........: 15 July 2011

« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2010, 04:36:04 am »

Why can't they introduce a law whereby the invitee can be legally held accountable if the visitor does not return? It should be an option. Like you have a 100% chance of getting a TVR, but if you overstay, the sponsor goes to jail.

Or just get rid of borders.


*frustrated*

1) Because jails are already overcrowded and expensive. The punishment really hurts Canadian taxpayers more than the invitee.  Also, can you see the invitee physically tackling the visitor and dragging hm to the airport.  The lawyers would have a field day.

2) A world without borders would mean all poor peoples would migrate to the richer areas -- and the richer peoples would end up paying for the newcomers` social services.  Everyone`s standard of living -- for workers and for lazy people -- would float to the same level: up fr the lazies and down for the industrious.  This is communism or socialism in disguise, and while it makes a beautiful theory, history shows that human nature cannot stand a socialistic environment for too long. Too many opportunists, too much resentment. 
Logged

Nov 09 Application to Mississauga
Nov 09 Approved; sent to Hong Kong.
Interview April 4, 2011 (so slow!!). Passed.
15 April 2011 New medical done.
7 July 2011  COPR received.
15 July 2011 landed in Vancouver. At last.
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