How much can I earn while working as a student in Canada?
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Author Topic: How much can I earn while working as a student in Canada?  (Read 7330 times)
rick86
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« on: May 27, 2010, 08:22:08 am »

Hello,

I got admission in Master of Computer Science in Canada. My program fee is $CAD 24000 for two years . I am using bank lone to pay my 1st year fee which is $CAD 12000.  I would like to know how much can I earn in Canada as graduate student will I be able to pay my 2nd year fee i.e $CAD 12000 by working as graduate student. I am not getting any funding, Schlorships etc to pay it. I Would like to know views of international students already in this situation in Canada?

Thanks
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Regina
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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2010, 10:09:57 am »

So you need 12 000 for tuition and approximately 10000 for living, total 22 000 a year. However, if you start in September, you will be able to apply for off-campus work permit in March next year, let's say you will get it in April, so you have April  to August to earn 22 000... sounds unreal to me.

Also, if I remember right, applying for Study permit you have to show you have enough funds for tuition and living for a whole program, in you case it is $44 000, or to prove you already have a source of future income to pay for the second year.

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PMM
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« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2010, 01:44:16 pm »

Hi

So you need 12 000 for tuition and approximately 10000 for living, total 22 000 a year. However, if you start in September, you will be able to apply for off-campus work permit in March next year, let's say you will get it in April, so you have April  to August to earn 22 000... sounds unreal to me.

Also, if I remember right, applying for Study permit you have to show you have enough funds for tuition and living for a whole program, in you case it is $44 000, or to prove you already have a source of future income to pay for the second year.



No, you only have to show funds for the first year tuition and living expenses.
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PMM
Regina
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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2010, 11:15:22 pm »

Quote
No, you only have to show funds for the first year tuition and living expenses.
If you are accepted for a two year program and ask for a study permit for a whole program? I doubt. You may have funds for the first year only IF you can prove that already you have a source which will provide you with necessary funds for the next year.
 However, maybe for people from different countries there are different requirements? I am sure only about countries of the ex-USSR that you must prove you have enough money or source of funds.
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PMM
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2010, 12:45:22 am »

Hi

\
If you are accepted for a two year program and ask for a study permit for a whole program? I doubt. You may have funds for the first year only IF you can prove that already you have a source which will provide you with necessary funds for the next year.
 However, maybe for people from different countries there are different requirements? I am sure only about countries of the ex-USSR that you must prove you have enough money or source of funds.

Maybe you would like to read the Operations Manual OP12 re: students.

7.7. Reviewing applicants for financial sufficiency
Officers need to satisfy themselves that applicants have sufficient financial resources to pay their
tuition fees, transportation costs to and from Canada, as well as living expenses for themselves
and any family members who may be accompanying them, without the need to engage in
employment.
Students are required to demonstrate financial sufficiency for only the first year of studies,
regardless of the duration of the course or program of studies in which they are enrolled
. In other
words, a single student entering a four-year degree program with an annual tuition fee of $15,000
must demonstrate funds of $15,000 to satisfy the requirements, and not the full $60,000 which
would be required for four years. Officers should be satisfied though that the probability of
funding for future years does exist, i.e., parents are employed; scholarship is for more than one
year. Applications for extensions made to CPC-V must also meet this requirement
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PMM
Regina
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2010, 09:23:27 am »

Thank you for your answer.

 That was I was talking about:
Officers should be satisfied  though that the probability of
funding for future years does exist, i.e., parents are employed; scholarship is for more than one
year.
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