Caregivers Finally Catch A Break

November 5th, 2014

Talk about a change of heart.

A few months back my blog dealt with the negative commentary emanating from Canadian government officials and targeting live-in caregivers, also known as the extended Filipino community in Canada.

Lo and behold, last week the very same government announced significant reforms to the caregiver program that can only be seen as hugely beneficial to the caregivers themselves.

Changes to the program include ending the live-in requirement. It will remain an option, but will no longer be mandatory. No longer will caregivers be forced to sleep where they work and have their wages garnished for room and board. It’s about time.

Of utmost importance to caregivers is the length of time they are separated from their spouses and children back home. As it stands now, a caregiver must first complete two years of full-time work in Canada before applying for Canadian permanent residence status and including their immediate family members in the application. Processing times are long and, in some cases, extend well beyond three years. Currently, there are 60,000 applications awaiting a decision. The government has committed to clear the backlog completely by 2016. A cap of 5,500 applications per year has now been imposed, with the goal of processing permanent resident applications within six months. If this goes as planned, it will be a praiseworthy accomplishment.

As I have stated previously, caregivers are dedicated, hard-working individuals. They do the type of work that Canadians shun, at any reasonable wage. I, for one, am glad that they are finally getting their just due. Better late than never.


 
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18 Responses to “Caregivers Finally Catch A Break”

  • On November 6th, 2014, sultan said ...

    I am so happy to hear some this nice news we want to come our dream country I sure we will benefit it

  • On November 6th, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    I am very happy to hear that.Hope they will imposed immediately as soon as possible.Thanks!

  • On November 6th, 2014, Eliazar said ...

    Thanks be to GOD”When will be the effectivity of this reform?thanks!

  • On November 7th, 2014, Sujee said ...

    Happy to hear.

  • On November 7th, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    It’s true I have a friend a nanny like me but she is not luck at all with her employer but she is working hard with family just waiting her open permit and find another employer,, that’s the good news for us under live in caregivers,, God bless Canada

  • On November 7th, 2014, John said ...

    Positive ! There will be much fewer employers willing to go this route so how is this positive for overseas caregivers ?? This is an employer driven program , taking the live in out will turn employers away from this program.

  • On November 8th, 2014, Alade said ...

    Interesting development.

  • On November 10th, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    glad to hear, finally

  • On November 10th, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    It is a good news

  • On November 11th, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    but will the cap mean that less caregivers are admitted to canada in the first place??

  • On November 12th, 2014, mohammed anwar hossain said ...

    this good news

  • On November 19th, 2014, Swedishsurveyor said ...

    Although i aplaud the sucess that Canada has had with its desperate refugees take not and be aware that the egalitarianism which seems to unite our two countries can go much too far.

    http://swedishsurveyor.wordpress.com/2014/11/16/does-statistics-sweden-have-something-to-hide/

    Friendly warning and love from Sweden

    //Swedish Surveyor

  • On November 23rd, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    I was here in Canada as live in caregiver from 2007 . I submitted my application for permanent residence May 2010. My family undergo medical examination last March 2014 but until now I did not received any notice / letter from CIC regarding my family status or my family application progress.

  • On December 9th, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    I guess this is good news because it provides caregivers some options. However, living outside the employer’s home is expensive. I came to Canada as a live in caregiver in 1999. Lived with a great family and was paid $1500 a month after taxes (plus free room and board). Saved $30K which allowed me to obtain a university degree after obtaining my permanent resident status. I have a good job now and I am very thankful for this live-in caregiver program.

  • On December 10th, 2014, Anonymous said ...

    I wonder how many employees does CIC in Vegreville have? If each of them works 5 days a week for at least 42 weeks giving them 10 weeks of vacation and each day will be able to review and approve 5 applications that will result to 1,125 each employee each year. How come there are 60,000 backlogs? Just a thought……

  • On December 10th, 2014, Pinoy Caregiver said ...

    The live-in requirement has some advantages and disadvantages. During winter, living in the employer’s house is favourable: no traffic, not waiting for delayed bus etc.

    But living out will stop the overtime that at times caregivers are not being paid or starting earlier than the usual hour of works.

    We’ll just have to wait for more changes to come. Will the CIC change the programs’s name later on. That’s interesting to find out.

  • On December 30th, 2014, Chris said ...

    While the mandatory live in aspect being removed seems like a good thing, I fount disturbing info at this CIC site.
    http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/tools/temp/work/permit/caregiver.asp
    It has this info
    •As of November 30, 2014, caregivers in the LCP now have the option to live in or live out, subject to the contracts with their employer.
    •Caregivers who live out are not considered part of the LCP, regardless of whether their previous work permit was issued in the LCP, and are not eligible to apply for permanent residence under the LCP.
    •However, caregivers who entered Canada as part of the LCP, and subsequently choose to live out, may re-enter the LCP by living in again, as long as they do so within their qualifying period for permanent residence application purposes.
    •Caregivers should be aware that moving from live-in to live-out and vice versa will require a new LMIA and a new work permit to reflect the conditions of employment or changes in the employment contract.

  • On January 10th, 2015, Anonymous said ...

    It’s true I have a friend a nanny like me but she is not luck at all with her employer but she is working hard with family just waiting her open permit and find another employer,, that’s the good news for us under live in caregivers, and finding the new employer with the same consultant asset gold

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